2016 FFA soil judging contest results

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It was a beautiful, brisk morning in early October on the Fairfield County farm of Walter Bader for the 2016 Ohio FFA state soil judging competitions.In agricultural soils the top five individuals were:Ethan Cockerill, Greenfield McClainHolly McClay, FredericktownSpencer Crauder, TalawandaRebecca McCarty, East KnoxRyan Matthews, FredericktownThe top five teams in agricultural soils were:1. Greenfield McClain2. East Knox3. Fredericktown4. Talawanda5. Buckeye Central High School.In urban soils the top five individuals were:Kendra Stahl, Buckeye CentralKendra Denton, FredericktownAusten Wood, Northwestern (West Salem)Cody Kiefer, TalawandaCraig Jasin, Centerville.The top five teams in urban soils were:Buckeye CentralTalawandaCentervilleGreenfield McClainNorthwestern (West Salem).last_img read more

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Central team to soon visit 11 flood-affected States

first_imgAn Inter-Ministerial Central Team (IMCT) under the Home Ministry will soon visit 11 flood-affected States, including Kerala and Assam, to assess the damage. The Ministry has changed rules and from now on, the IMCT will visit the affected areas even before receiving a memorandum from the State concerned. The other States that will be visited by the Central team are Meghalaya, Tripura, Bihar, Uttarakhand, Himachal Pradesh, Gujarat, Rajasthan, Maharashtra and Karnataka.Criticism from KeralaOn Tuesday, Kerala’s Finance Minister Thomas Isaac took to Twitter to criticise the Union Home Ministry of allocating “zero” funds to Kerala. “Home Ministry approves Rs 4,432 crores from National Disaster Response Fund for the flood affected States. Share of Kerala, the worst affected, is zero!” Mr. Isaac said on Twitter.A senior Home Ministry official said the Central team would soon visit other flood-affected States, including Kerala. In the combined rescue operations in the States affected by floods, landslides etc. during the current monsoon season, the NDRF, Army, Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard have rescued and shifted to safer places more than 1,53,000 people.‘Constituted immediately’“The IMCT will henceforth be constituted immediately in the aftermath of any natural calamity of severe nature, which will visit the affected areas in the State so as to have first-hand assessment of damages caused and relief work carried out by the State administration. The IMCT will again visit the State after submission of the memorandum for detailed assessment of the damage and relief operations conducted for making final recommendations for allocation of additional funds,” the Home Ministry said in a statement. At present, the IMCT visits the affected State only once, after the receipt of the memorandum from the State.The Centre has also approved release of over ₹4,432 crore to Odisha, Karnataka and Himachal Pradesh for the damage caused by natural calamities in these States during the last financial year.Assistance approvedIn a statement, the Home Ministry said a high-level committee, headed by Union Home Minister Amit Shah, has approved additional Central assistance of ₹3338.22 crore to Odisha for the damage caused by the cyclone Fani; ₹1029.39 crore to Karnataka for drought; and ₹64.49 crore to Himachal Pradesh for avalanches and hailstorm during 2018-19.The funds will be disbursed from the National Disaster Response Fund (NDRF). This additional assistance is over and above the funds released by the Centre in the State Disaster Response Fund (SDRF) already placed at the disposal of States.During 2018-19, the Central government had released ₹9,658 crore to all States, and during 2019-20, till date, it has released ₹6,104 crore to 24 States from the SDRF, the statement said.The meeting also reviewed the ongoing flood situation in different parts of the country and the logistic support provided by Central agencies, including the deployment of the NDRF and Defence forces.last_img read more

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AUSTOUCH RISE PREDICTED FOR 2005

first_imgAusTouch took off in 2004 and as the year draws to a close Marianne Maguire and her team reflect on the year that has been for AusTouch and make some great predictions about the growth for 2005, including the expected rise in participants in NSW. Please read the attached newsletter for all the information. AUSTOUCH DECEMBER 2004 NEWSLETTERlast_img

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10 months agoCarroll admits West Ham let themselves down for Burnley defeat

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Carroll admits West Ham let themselves down for Burnley defeatby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWest Ham striker Andy Carroll says they let themselves down for defeat at Burnley.The Hammers gave themselves a mountain to climb after falling 2-0 down to goals from Chris Wood and Dwight McNeil before the break – and it was a summit they couldn’t reach even after the introduction of Carroll and Grady Diangana at half-time.“It was very disappointing, a poor game for everyone,” he said. “We’re much better than that and I thought we could have done better from start to finish.“Second half we created a few more chances, but it was disappointing not to get many before then and obviously see them create so many.“Luckily we had Lukasz in net and he’s been great all season. He kept us in it.“I had a couple of chances, it was a great save from Tom Heaton. Cress put a good ball in and he saved it well. I was unlucky there, but overall it’s just a bad day.“We’re a good team and we’ve had a lot of players out injured. When they come back it will be a big boost, but we have a good team and we’ve just got to put this behind us and move on.” last_img read more

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4 days agoMan City boss Guardiola a fan of Gasperini and Atalanta

first_imgAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Man City boss Guardiola a fan of Gasperini and Atalantaby Carlos Volcano4 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City boss Pep Guardiola admits he’s a fan of Champions League opponents Atalanta.City host Gian Piero Gasperini’s Atalanta on Tuesday night.“What I said about (Maurizio) Sarri I could say about Gasperini, I was lucky enough to meet him before,” said Guardiola.“Having seen what Atalanta did last year and what they’re doing this season is incredible.“It’s a great joy to watch his team play, they’re brave, they respect their supporters. The way they play is unusual, they take quite a few risks.“In this match both teams are very brave, and they will try to impose the game, we will have to adapt and they will do the same.“I hope it will be an open match, both teams score and concede. I hope it will be a lively match.” last_img read more

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Ultimate Frisbee Is In The Dark Ages Of Analytics — And It

Ultimate should be fertile ground for analytics. The mostly amateur sport first blossomed at universities and remains popular with engineers, computer scientists, mathematicians and teachers — curious, creative nerds eager to break down the sport and share what they learn. Its profile is growing, too. This summer, the International Olympic Committee made the sport eligible to be included in a future Summer Olympics.When I attended the under-23 world tournament in England this summer, I saw hundreds of the sport’s future stars coached by some of its brightest minds, but I also saw a sport missing something vital: detailed data.It’s easy to take sports data for granted in an age when cameras track and quantify the movement of players and balls in baseball, basketball, tennis and soccer. The biggest challenges for analysts in those sports is how to wrangle and make sense of all that data and to get fans to look past traditional box-score numbers.But in ultimate, there are hardly any traditional box-score numbers. Other sports have digitized stat-keeping even at the college or high-school level. But for ultimate, even at a relatively organized and well-run event like the under-23 worlds, the sport’s best young players checked opponents’ scores on schedules filled in by hand. Coaches — including my FiveThirtyEight colleague Jody Avirgan, an assistant coach for the U.S. men’s team — carried clipboards to log who played each point, with paper flapping in the wind and ink blurring in the rain. Players got a glimpse of what wealth can bring to a sport every time they walked past one of Watford FC’s brand-new 500,000 pound ($750,000) fields, but rope fences made clear that the Premier League team’s training ground was off-limits — as were stats as advanced and sophisticated as the EPL’s.At best, ultimate box scores — such as those posted on the under-23 worlds website — contain just goals, assists and Ds (discs knocked down or intercepted). “That is Stone Age material to work with,” said Sean Childers, an ultimate player and co-author of a study on ultimate presented last year at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, in an email. “Imagine a baseball or basketball box score from 50 years ago, but worse.”Ultimate coaches dream of stats corresponding to some of their favorites from other sports. Several wished hockey assists — the pass that leads to the pass for the score — were tracked. Bob Krier, head coach of the U.S. men’s under-23 team, wants to see a shooting percentage for the most difficult passes into the end zone. Others want stats on “pulls,” ultimate’s version of kickoffs: Coaches suspect pulls matter a lot in helping a team set up its defense, both for how long they hang in the air and for where they land.A catch-all metric for player value such as wins above replacement would be nice, too. But Martin Aguilera, who coached the U.S. mixed team at the under-23 championships this year, said, “We’re so far away from that.”Many coaches said they look to basketball for stats they want to see for ultimate. On the surface, ultimate has more in common with football (passing toward a score in an end zone), soccer (a field sport with fluid positions and no play clock) and tennis (starting a point on offense is like serving, and scoring on a defensive point is called breaking). But ultimate has similar defensive principles to basketball, with players switching suddenly from offense to defense and both teams resetting after each score.Plus, basketball has lots of cool data. Ultimate nerds speak with envy and awe about SportVU, the system of cameras that ring NBA arenas and produce data about where the players and ball are at every moment of each game. And they cite the shooting charts of FiveThirtyEight’s Kirk Goldsberry as models for charts they’d love to see, ones that would map success rates for players’ shots at the end zone by field position.Other sports are also seeking better data than their traditional, limited box scores provide. In volleyball, “the official stat sheet is basically useless,” said Todd Dagenais, coach of the University of Central Florida women’s team. He’s seeking better stats to help his team but says there’s a dividend for spectators, too: A smarter sport is more fun to watch. “When an offense is run well, fans love that, which causes the defense to have to make more spectacular moves and more spectacular plays, which is also very entertaining,” he said.Ultimate’s stats are stuck in the Stone Age in part because it takes a lot of work to get not a lot of insight. To improve on the kind of time-consuming, manual stat-keeping process that some coaches at the world championships were using, ultimate players developed an app to track players moving around the field. The Ultiapps Stat Tracker can generate heat maps showing the best scoring spots. Childers and a fellow researcher used data from the app to figure out where those spots are and which players were best at getting the disc there. What they found mostly reinforced basic tenets of the sport, like the importance of keeping the disc in the middle of the field. The heat map above, which is from the paper by Childers and Jeremy Weiss, shows a team’s likelihood of scoring from different points on the field. As a team moves closer and closer to the end zone (at the top of the chart), its chances of scoring increase (the higher the number, the better). The large dip in the 40-percent zone — shown as 0.4 — suggests that a team is just as likely to score from about 50 yards outside the end zone (marked as 20 on the heat map) in the middle of the field as they are from 35 but stuck on the sideline.But data collected at one level of the sport with, say, little wind may not translate into a different level in windy conditions. Partly because of limitations like that one, teams mostly have stopped using the app to collect data.“Teams liked our analysis but found collecting and inputting the data was too onerous to justify the time investment,” Childers said.Part of would-be ultimate analysts’ challenge is that top ultimate players don’t play that many meaningful points1Each game of ultimate is played to a certain number of points, and each team must keep the same group of players on the field until the next point is scored. in a season. Players might play during only eight or 10 points of a game because top teams are deep, usually with more than twice the number of players on the sideline as are on the field at any time. And the roster is rarely the same from tournament to tournament.2Even in an age when ESPN is airing ultimate, no one makes a living playing the sport. Top players often skip tournaments because of personal or job conflicts.Even if everyone could agree on which new stats are needed in a sport like ultimate, a tough question remains: Whose job should it be to collect the stats? Tournaments are mostly run by volunteers focused on tasks such as ensuring players find the right field, have enough water and uphold the sport’s unique spirit of the game during play. That leaves coaches to keep any extra stats they’d want for analysis. But they’re also busy doing lots of other things during tournaments. It’s often easier to collect advanced stats during tryouts or practices instead.For the under-23 tournament, U.K. mixed coaches had to choose 26 players from 93 who showed up at trials. They divided them into six groups and filmed them, rating them in 24 categories. None was scores, assists or Ds. The categories were more subtle: essential but hard-to-measure ultimate and interpersonal skills. One, for example, was “nicehead,” which gauged how well someone played with others. “What we didn’t want to do is pick very skilled players who couldn’t interact with other human beings,” coach Megan Hurst said. She and her fellow coach Felix Shardlow entered all the stats into a big spreadsheet and looked for players whose low ratings came in categories they could easily improve, like catching. Aguilera thinks that more ultimate should be filmed and that more film should be watched. He filmed games at the under-23 worlds from atop a ladder he’d bought for 30 pounds ($45) just before the tournament. Many top college basketball players have seen hundreds of games by the time they get to campus. Incoming college ultimate players might have watched fewer than 20 ultimate games, Aguilera said.Absent data, coaches have to rely on scouting to get ahead. Film analysis has become a hallmark of the best college and club programs in the country. And it was on display at the tournament in England, too.Take, for example, the women’s final between the U.S. and Japan. Mike Whitaker, the head coach of the U.S. team who’d been scouting that Canada-Colombia game with his assistants near the start of the tournament, said that Japan used “advanced scouting more than any other team at the worlds.” The Japanese team brought personnel dedicated to the practice, which played a big role in the final’s outcome. He noticed Japan made adjustments to its defense after its group-stage game against the Americans (the U.S. won 17-13) and scouting other U.S. games.Eri Hirai, Japan’s head coach, said the team tracked which players on other tournament teams threw the most long passes and which ones ran the most. Harai said this kind of scouting is standard practice in Japan. “It’s very important because we knew nothing about other teams before the tournament,” she said in an email interview conducted through a translator. By the end of the tournament, the Japanese team knew enough about the Americans to win the final in a big upset, 17-15. It was the only game any U.S. team lost in the tournament. ST ALBANS, England — On a field 20 miles north of London, three people were camped on the edge of a field wearing USA Ultimate hoodies, notebooks open in front of them. They were the coaches of the U.S.’s under-23 women’s team, and they were scouting two of their biggest Ultimate Frisbee rivals, Canada and Colombia, who were about to play in a group-stage match of the 2015 world championships. The coaches barely even had any data on their own team — but there they were, scrounging for some on their future opponents. Read more: A Plea For More Frisbee Data From A U.S. Ultimate Coach Riley Erickson records video of future opponents for the U.S. mixed team. Carl Bialik Head coach Mike Whitaker and assistant coaches Carolyn Matthews and Lauren Boyle of the U.S. women’s team. Carl Bialik read more

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Commentary student athletes should have choice of when to go pro

Since the beginning of collegiate athletics and the birth of the NCAA, a war has been waging.Should student athletes be paid?These players, particularly in football and basketball, help bring in potentially millions of dollars at major universities, but because of NCAA restrictions, they are unable to profit from this themselves.But if they want to make money, and have the talents to do so, why can’t they just skip a level and head straight to the professional ranks? Nothing is making these student athletes attend college, right?Again the NCAA rears its ugly head.Although certain sports like baseball and soccer currently have no restrictions on when an athlete can start making money in their given field, basketball players have the option to be “one-and-done” and head to the NBA after their freshman year, and football players can leave campus after three years.ESPN reported that Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany said Wednesday that the idea of forcing athletes to attend a university before they go into the field is ludicrous.“Maybe in football and basketball, it would work better if more kids had a chance to go directly into the professional ranks. If they’re not comfortable and want to monetize, let the minor leagues flourish,” Delany said.These years spent in college are often for the protection of the players, and it would be incredibly difficult for a player to make the jump directly from high school to the NFL due to the change in speed. I tend to agree with Delany.Before the NCAA and NBA implemented the rules in basketball that forced a player to wait at least a year before joining the league in 2005, there were numerous athletes who made the jump and succeeded. Players like Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant in 1996, Houston Rockets center Dwight Howard in 2004 and Brooklyn Nets forward Kevin Garnett in 1995 have all been perennial All-Stars since joining the league. Not to mention the fact that Miami Heat forward Lebron James in 2003 will go down as one of the greatest players in the history of the game without ever playing a minute of college basketball.Sure for every Lebron there is a Kwame Brown, center for the Philadelphia 76ers, that cannot cope with the speed and physicality, but they should be allowed to take that risk themselves.If a player judges they are capable of holding their own in the league, that should be their choice and theirs alone, not one of a larger governing body.In most other fields, this sort of thing would come off as utterly ludicrous. Imagine if Michael J. Fox or Justin Timberlake were forced to postpone their careers in entertainment for a couple of years because a group decided they needed the experience college could grant them.Even if a player does have that extra experience, there is no guarantee they will become a star. Former Ohio State center Greg Oden is considered one of the NBA’s biggest busts because of suffering through a multitude of knee injuries. Oden even spent his required year in college instead of just jumping straight from high school.While the discussion continues about whether or not players should be paid. it is time for a change in the NCAA rulebook.The removal of a player’s requirement to attend college will slow, at least partially, the number of scandals involving student athletes being compensated that have surfaced in recent years.Overall, a rule change would be beneficial to all parties involved, so it would only make sense if such a rule change were to be implemented.Delany said it best.“Why is it our job to be minor leagues for professional sports?” read more

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Ohio State Cincinnati football connection runs deep

Left: OSU junior defensive lineman Adolphus Washington (92) makes a tackle during a game against Navy on Aug. 30 at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. OSU won, 34-17. Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorRight: OSU cornerbacks coach Kerry Coombs celebrates during a game against Wisconsin on Nov. 17, 2012 at Camp Randall Stadium in Madison, Wis. OSU won, 21-14, in overtime.Credit: Lantern file photoWhile 109 miles of interstate and city streets separate Ohio Stadium from Cincinnati’s Nippert Stadium, there are deep ties connecting the programs that play in each arena.From Ohio State coach Urban Meyer to junior defensive lineman Adolphus Washington, there are numerous Buckeye coaches and players who have, or could have, spent time on the Bearcats’ sidelines.After a brief stint in minor league baseball, Meyer played defensive back at Cincinnati before graduating in 1986. OSU cornerbacks coach and special teams coordinator Kerry Coombs was on the Cincinnati staff from 2007-11, tight ends coach Tim Hinton was an assistant with the Bearcats from 2004-09 and Washington — one of four Cincinnati natives on the team — received his first collegiate scholarship offer from the Bearcats as a freshman in high school.Meyer described his ongoing connection to Cincinnati as a “very strong, emotional attachment,” even beyond his own experience at the school.“My sister is associate provost at Cincinnati, my other sister was a homecoming queen there,” he said Monday. “Obviously my dad, my grandfather, just a strong history at UC.”While he played college ball at Nippert Stadium, Meyer never spent time on the sidelines as a coach like Coombs and Hinton.Coombs said the personal and professional connections he and his wife have to Cincinnati led to his turning down offers from other major college football programs before Meyer came calling.“When we had the opportunity to go to Notre Dame, we were staying in Cincinnati,” Coombs said. “Cincinnati is our home.”The Colerain, Ohio, native said he and his wife, Holly, grew up within miles of each other and added the draw of coaching at OSU under Meyer was the only thing that could have torn him away from Cincinnati.“When Urban called, I called my wife and said ‘Hey, I just wanted to let you know I got this phone call today, and kind of before I tell him no I just wanted to let you know that,’” Coombs said. “She said ‘Don’t you tell him no,’ and I said ‘Is that right?’”Coombs said his wife told him “let’s go do this, we can make it work,” with the simple reasoning that Columbus is less than two hours away from their lifelong home in Cincinnati.While his wife made the decision easier, Coombs called the conversation “terrible” that he had with then-Cincinnati coach Butch Jones to tell him he was leaving for OSU. He said conversations with others were just as bad.“It was hard for me to tell anybody,” he said. “I mean, that’s my hometown, and I grew up on the Reds and the Bengals and the Bearcats.”Coombs said growing up with exposure to the Buckeyes made his transition easier, but added that telling the players he recruited to Cincinnati was the hardest part about leaving. He said some of the players he recruited still play for the Bearcats, but one player he tried to get to Cincinnati is set to be on the OSU sidelines when the two teams play on Saturday.Washington said he took an official visit to Cincinnati and had the Bearcats just behind the Buckeyes on his final list.“It actually was my second choice,” he said. “Coach Coombs, when he was there, did a great job of recruiting me, but I just felt like Ohio State was the best place for me.”Like Meyer and others around the OSU program, Washington’s connection to Cincinnati goes beyond recruiting letters and official visits.“I went to basketball games (at Cincinnati), because my granddad worked there for like 35, 40 years,” Washington said. “He was a janitor and he would get tickets and we would go to basketball games there.”Just like Coombs said the draw of coaching under Meyer was a key to his decision to move to OSU, Washington said the chance to play for the two-time national champion was too much to pass up.“Didn’t know a lot about him (Meyer), but I knew he had won two national championships (at Florida),” Washington said. “So I figured I could probably get one under my belt in the four years he was there.”While the draw of potentially winning titles contributed to Washington’s decision to pick OSU, Hinton said he was fortunate to be at Cincinnati — which has yet to win a national championship — for some of the program’s most successful seasons.“It was a phenomenal run, you’ve got an Orange Bowl and Sugar Bowl,” Hinton said of his time with the Bearcats. “And how special was that when you’re a UC guy? It was very, very special.”Whether Washington will win the national championship he hoped for is yet to be seen, but he is set to at least have a shot to win one game against the school he nearly attended on Saturday.Coombs said the matchup will be fun for him, but because of his deep-lying connections with the Bearcats, he said the game will be more difficult than his average Saturday on the sidelines.“Football is always fun, I don’t have any days that aren’t fun,” Coombs said. “But it’s harder, for all those reasons, I think it’s harder.”The Buckeyes and Bearcats are set to kick off at 6 p.m. at Ohio Stadium. read more

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Ohio State set for rematch with Michigan State in Big Ten Tournament

Freshman guard D’Angelo Russell (0) eludes a Minnesota defender during a 2nd round game of the Big Ten Tournament on March 12 in Chicago. OSU won, 79-73. Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorCHICAGO — After defeating the Minnesota Golden Gophers in the second round of the Big Ten Tournament, the Ohio State men’s basketball team is getting set for yet another rematch.The Buckeyes are set to meet the No. 3 seed Michigan State Spartans Friday night, a team that dispatched OSU, 59-56, on Valentine’s Day.The matchup has brought out the best in both schools as of late, as Michigan State holds a 5-4 edge over the Buckeyes in the past four years.Two of those games have come in the Big Ten Tournament, with the teams splitting the pair.“They have a great team, I feel like we have a great team as well. We have played each other so many times, regular season and (Big Ten) tournament it feels like every year,” OSU senior guard Shannon Scott said of Michigan State. “It always comes down to the wire with them. We just have to be ready for that.”Thad Matta, who became OSU’s winningest coach with the victory over Minnesota, agreed with Scott, joking that the the Buckeyes and Spartans shouldn’t even play the entire game.“The battles over the years that we’ve had, honestly tomorrow what we should do is just start with one minute on the clock and save ourselves,” Matta said. “They always seem to come down to the last minute of the game.”That was the case earlier this season when Spartan junior guard Denzel Valentine buried a fadeaway 3-pointer in the final seconds to give Michigan State the win over OSU.Scott, who scored a career-high 21 points in the win over the Golden Gophers, said the feeling around the OSU locker room is that the Buckeyes are now a different team than they were when they lost in East Lansing, Mich.“We are a hungry team. We know they beat us earlier. We know we could have won that game,” Scott said. “Every single guy on my team feels like we can win this game coming up.”While Scott led the Buckeyes in scoring in the Feb. 14 loss with 15 points, it was his backcourt counterpart who struggled against the Spartans.Freshman guard D’Angelo Russell scored just 10 points on 4-of-13 shooting that day while the OSU bench accounted for just three points.That was not the case for the Buckeyes on Thursday night against Minnesota as the they had three players in double figures scoring – Russell and Scott with more than 20 each – and senior forward Sam Thompson adding nine points and a team-high seven rebounds.Russell said if the Buckeyes can maintain their consistency throughout the team and the tournament, Michigan State will have a hard time disposing of them.“Good luck with it. We weren’t playing great basketball against them last time,” Russell said. “Them being physical, I couldn’t go where I wanted to go. We are a different basketball team now.”Whether the Buckeyes are a different team or not, Matta said he will look at the film from the last matchup between the two teams before taking the floor Friday night.“As crazy as it sounds, I actually look forward to tomorrow night because I know it’s gonna be a heck of a basketball game,” he said.The Buckeyes and Spartans are set to tip about 25 minutes after the Maryland vs. Indiana matchup, which is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. read more

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Mens Basketball No 5 Ohio State looks to avoid upset at hands

Ohio State freshman center Kaleb Wesson posts up against Michigan center Moritz Wagner in the matchup between the two teams on Feb. 18, 2018. Michigan won 74-62. Credit: Jacob Myers | Managing Editor for ContentA new season begins for the Ohio State men’s basketball team.That seemed to be the narrative of the team after its loss to Penn State in the Buckeyes’ first game of the Big Ten tournament. It will take time to shake off the loss, but their season is not over.That new season begins at 4:30 p.m. Thursday when the fifth-seeded Buckeyes travel to Boise, Idaho, to face 12th-seeded South Dakota State in Ohio State’s first game in the NCAA Tournament since the 2014-15 season.Should Ohio State advance past the Jackrabbits, it will likely take on fourth-seeded Gonzaga, a team that stomped the Buckeyes 86-59 in the first meeting between the two. After that, it could be top-seeded Xavier. Projected StartersSouth Dakota StateG — Brandon Key — Junior, 5-foot-10, 180 lbs., 6.0 ppg, 1.5 rpg, 3.3 apgG — David Jenkins — Freshman, 6-foot-2, 190 lbs., 16.1 ppg, 3.3 rpg, 1.6 apgF — Skyler Flatten — Senior, 6-foot-6, 215 lbs., 7.0 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 1.2 apgF — Reed Tellinghuisen — Senior, 6-foot-7, 215 lbs., 12.0 ppg, 4.7 rpg, 1.6 apgC — Mike Daum — Junior, 6-foot-9, 250 lbs., 23.8 ppgs, 10.4 rpg, 1.3 apgOhio StateG — C.J. Jackson — Junior, 6-foot-1, 175 lbs., 12.2 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 3.9 apgG — Kam Williams — Redshirt senior, 6-foot-2, 185 lbs., 8.2 ppg, 2.0 rpg, 0.7 apgF — Jae’Sean Tate — Senior, 6-foot-4, 230 lbs., 12.5 ppg, 6.2 rpg, 2.9 apgF — Keita Bates-Diop — Redshirt junior, 6-foot-7, 235 lbs., 19.4 ppg, 8.8 rpg, 1.7 apgC — Kaleb Wesson — Freshman, 6-foot-9, 270 lbs., 10.8 ppg, 5.2 rpg, 1.1 apgScouting South Dakota StateTeams that have given Ohio State issues this season have been teams with large or athletic guards that have been able to challenge the Buckeyes to lean more on their smaller guards — C.J. Jackson, Kam Williams and Andrew Dakich — to step up defensively. That has not been the key to South Dakota State’s success in 2018. One of its starting two guards is under 6-foot, and the other is only 6-foot-2, meaning the Buckeyes should not run into a size mismatch like it has in the past against teams like Penn State.Instead of relying on their guards, the Jackrabbits have received solid production from freshman guard David Jenkins, but they have leaned on junior center Mike Daum when they need production. Nicknamed “The Daum-inator,” the 6-foot-9 center has demonstrated an ability to score from all areas on the court, making 47.4 percent of shots from 2 and 42.9 percent from 3. Ohio State has had mixed levels of success against star centers this season. It held Michigan’s 6-foot-11 Moritz Wagner to a combined 26 points in the two games played and North Carolina center Luke Maye to nine points in the one game between the two teams. However, the Buckeyes allowed Purdue’s 7-foot-2 center Isaac Haas to drop 18, Butler forward Kelan Martin to score 24 and Gonzaga center Johnathan Williams to put up 21 points.However, most of the struggles came earlier in the season. Ohio State freshman center Kaleb Wesson has improved his defense since those games — he was matched up with Williams in his first career start. Though his defense is still far from perfect and needs improving, he should be able to prevent Daum from posting his 13th 30-point game on the Buckeyes.Overall, the Jackrabbits are not a team that would appear to give Ohio State much matchup problems. South Dakota State has struggled to force turnovers this season, which is good for an Ohio State team that has run into turnover issues throughout the campaign. The Jackrabbits have also struggled to defend against opponents who derive most of their offensive production in the post. Opposing teams have generated 52.4 percent of their points from inside the arc and are shooting 49.8 percent inside. Ohio State, on the other hand, has scored 55.4 percent of its points inside this season, 30th-highest in the nation, while shooting 55.1 percent inside, 29th-best. South Dakota State won’t make any mistakes — it has the lowest turnover rate this season. It also has lived and died by the 3 this season, posting a 26th-best 39.2 percent shooting rate from 3 while generating 37.5 percent of its offense from beyond the arc, 37th-highest in the country.Opponents have find about average success against Ohio State from 3, shooting 34.6 percent (149th-best), but have consistently found that to be the way to attack the Buckeyes. Ohio State has seen opposing teams score 35.1 percent of their total points from 3, the 55th-highest rate in the country.The Bottom LineThis game in a way has that feeling of a typical five-seed vs. 12-seed matchup in the tournament. Many are not giving South Dakota State a chance. They don’t have the typical characteristics of a team that has given Ohio State trouble this season and do not have a single Tier-A win — a top-50 win adjusting for location — on their schedule, according to advanced statistics website KenPom.com. The ability of the Jackrabbits to shoot 3s with success should make the game interesting, but outside of Daum, they do not have the interior defense to be able to stop players like redshirt junior Keita Bates-Diop and Wesson from having big games.PredictionOhio State wins 77-68 read more

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