Ohio cancels live bird shows due to avian flu risk

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In an aggressive move designed to help protect Ohio’s $2.3 billion poultry industry from the avian flu that has so negatively impacted other poultry-producing states, today the Ohio Department of Agriculture canceled all live bird exhibitions this year. The ban includes county and independent fairs, the Ohio State Fair, and all other gatherings of birds for show or for sale, including auctions and swap meets. Similar bans have been enacted in other poultry states. So far, Ohio is virus-free and the move is intended to continue that status.Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) — also called the avian flu — is an extremely contagious virus that primarily affects domestic poultry and is believed to be spread by wild, migrating birds. The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) first confirmed the virus in the U.S. beginning in late 2014. Since that time more than 44 million birds at more than 197 locations have been affected.“This was a difficult decision because it means young people can’t show their birds at fairs, but it’s in the best interest of an industry that literally thousands of Ohio families and businesses depend on and which provides billions of dollars to our state’s economy. The right move isn’t always the easy move, but this is the right move, especially when you see just how devastating the virus has been to other big poultry states like Iowa and Minnesota. Ohioans need to do all we can to ensure that we protect our industry and that we help avoid a costly spike in the price of important foods like chicken, turkey and eggs,” said David T. Daniels, Ohio Department of Agriculture Director.Ohio is the second largest egg producer in the country and home to 28 million laying chickens, 12 million broilers, 8.5 million pullets and 2 million turkeys. Ohio’s egg, chicken and turkey farms employ more than 14,600 jobs and contribute $2.3 billion to the state’s economy. Ohio’s role in national poultry production is even greater considering the loss that other major poultry states are experiencing.“One of the ways avian influenza spreads is by direct contact with contaminated materials coming from other infected birds. This means that exhibitions, auctions and swap meets where birds are co-mingling pose a high risk of unintentionally spreading this disease. Until we can be sure that there has been no transference from the wild bird population migrating through the state, we need to do all we can to minimize the exposure for our domestic birds,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Forshey.Similar concern about the potential spread of disease that can happen when birds are brought together for shows and sales has caused Ohio’s neighboring states of Indiana, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Michigan to make the decision to cancel shows for at least the 2015 fair season. Of those states, only Indiana has had a flock test positive for HPAI.The Ohio Department of Agriculture is working closely with the state’s poultry producers and the USDA APHIS to provide training and to closely monitor the health of poultry in the state. Detailed plans and protocols are in place to allow for a quick and coordinated response in the event HPAI is detected in Ohio. Human health and food safetyDespite the severity of the outbreak in birds, no human infections have been associated with HPAI and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers the risk to people from these viruses to be low. Federal and state law already ensures birds and poultry products that are affected by HPAI are prohibited from entering the food chain.Consumers should continue to employ standard food safety practices. Cooking poultry, including game birds, to the proper temperature and preventing cross contamination between raw and cooked food are always recommended to protect against viruses and bacteria. Recommendations for local fairsThe department is working with county and independent fair boards to identify options that will keep youth who are already raising poultry from losing their opportunity to have a fair project. The recommendations include amending the deadlines for students to switch projects and allowing the use of props or photos in place of live birds.“The experience of raising a live animal to show at the fair builds character and teaches responsibility. We don’t want to deprive anyone the opportunity to complete their projects. For that reason, we are working with Ohio State University Extension to send out guidance to the fair boards and 4-H committees urging them to be creative and find a solution that will allow their young people to still have a fair experience, even if they cannot bring their project to the fairgrounds,” said Director Daniels. Biosecurity recommendations for poultry ownersDr. Forshey is reminding all bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, to continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, keep birds inside as much as possible, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to their veterinarian immediately.Good biosecurity practices for poultry owners include the following:Monitor flocks for unusual signs of illness such as “snicking” (sneezing), a 1 percent or more decrease in egg production, or an increase in mortality. Other signs to look for are wheezing, lethargy, and depression.Practice personal biosecurity and avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.Keep unauthorized visitors from having contact with poultry, a good practice whether or not there is a disease threat. Authorized persons should be required to wear protective clothing and shoes before entering a commercial poultry house.Avoid contact between your birds and wild birds whenever possible due to the migratory nature of HPAI. These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing sick.Clean and disinfect farm vehicles or equipment before moving them on and off your property.Sick birds or unusual bird deaths should also be immediately reported to the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Division of Animal Health at 1-614-728-6220 or through USDA APHIS’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity from USDA APHIS for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov or by visiting www.ohioagriculture.gov.last_img read more

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Seizing Opportunity: How CrashCorp Became SimpleGeo

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts chris cameron Back-end geolocation data providers SimpleGeo announced today that it has raised over $8 million in Series A funding. Included among the investors is Redpoint Ventures, First Round Capital and Foundry Group, which like SimpleGeo, is located in Boulder, Colorado. While the news of the funding is certainly interesting, the more fascinating story about SimpleGeo is how the company got to where it is today. Like many early-stage startups, SimpleGeo is the evolution of an earlier company which had a similar but significantly different focus. That company, CrashCorp, was created by SocialThing founder Matt Galligan and Joe Stump, former Chief Architect at Digg. Their original plan was create mobile games using augmented reality, but they soon learned that the hardest part was developing the back-end geolocation infrastructure that would support their applications.It was at this point that Galligan and Stump saw an opportunity, quickly changed directions and created SimpleGeo. Instead of jumping in the with the masses of application developers using augmented reality to wow smart-phone users, the pair instead focused on serving the needs of the developers themselves, creating a “geodata in a box” service. With SimpleGeo as a foundation, application developers can skip the hard development work and build their own apps that utilize location-awareness and augmented reality, much like the Foursquares and Layars of today. SimpleGeo’s transformation from CrashCorp is not unlike that of Occipital, whose shift following unsuccessful fundraising efforts led to the creation of RedLaser, the well-known barcode scanning iPhone application. Occipital also now serves as a back-end infrastructure for other applications that want to take advantage of its image recognition technology. Some applications will go as far as to combine these various infrastructures into a single application. stickybits, which debuted at South by Southwest earlier this year, built an application using both Occipital and SimpleGeo to create a location-based social barcode scanning experience for users – a truly unique mashup of technologies.Sometimes the best strategy for a new startup isn’t joining the zeitgeist and attempting to steal users from one service or another; it’s being the skeleton that lets others launch their projects more easily. For both Occipital and SimpleGeo, shifting directions out of the app development rat race led them to their current success as back-end service providers. Of course, they never would have wound up in their current positions had they never ventured into the startup scene in the first place, so don’t be disappointed when your first great idea ends up being a bust – it may just lead to the next big thing.center_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#start#startups last_img read more

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Investors Debate Predictions of a Pending Super Seed Crash

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Analysis#start 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts center_img audrey watters On Saturday VC Paul Kedrosky wrote about “The Coming Super-Seed Crash,” sparking a debate across several blogs and Twitter about the state of VC and angel investment. Kedrosky’s post describes the changing landscape for startup financing with the rise in “super-seed” firms, those that deal with about $20 million in investments and “specialize in seeding a bazillion companies.” Kedrosky contends that “the super-seed crash is coming” because of the both increasing number of super-seed firms and the excessive number of companies being seeded this way. This overfunding of startups upsets valuations, returns, and potential follow-on investment, argues Kedrosky – all in a market catering to a “financially anaerobic U.S. consumer who is shopped out and indebted to death.” Many investors disagreed with Kedrosky’s arguments, in both the blog’s comments and on Twitter, arguing that they had not experienced the overblown valuations or funding competitions that Kedrosky described. Chris Sacca, who launched his Lowercase Capital investment firm last week with a creed about startup financing, wrote in the comments on Kedrosky’s blog, that while there may be an “abundance of undisciplined angels who are tossing money at startups,” super-seed firms do not cause investment prices and returns to be out-of-whack. Furthermore, Sacca suggested, Kedrosky’s analysis missed the point: super-seed funds don’t need the same “extraordinary” exits that VCs do and that lower business costs allow startups to have a slow burn rate, to be able to pivot, and to not have to scramble for Series A funding.VC Albert Wenger wrote on Continuations this morning that he agrees with some of Kedrosky’s predictions about a pending “super-seed crash.” Wenger writes, “From a social perspective I believe that overfunding of startups (which is what Paul argues is happening) is actually a good thing. Even if a bunch of super angels wind up not succeeding, there will be a lasting benefit to society from training many more entrepreneurs and people who know how to work at a startup.” Wenger believes it’s not the “authentic super-angel innovators” who are likely to be impacted by a bursting super seed stage investment bubble. Rather, says Wenger, it’s the “folks who are coming late to this party” – unknown funds and corporate incubators, for example.In response to some of the feedback, Kedrosky did update his original post, adding some more details to his argument but reiterating “incumbent VCs” along with the “super-angels” may be in peril. But many of the investors who responded to his ideas remain bullish.Photo credits: Flickr user Woodley Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

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Punjab cop booked for rape

first_imgPunjab Police on Friday registered a case of rape against Additional Inspector General of Police (Crime) Randhir Singh Uppal based on a complaint by a married woman who is a law student. The police said the case has been registered at the Cantonment police station in Amritsar under Sections 376C, 354D, 506 and 498 of the Indian Penal Code, besides relevant sections of the Arms Act as well. The charges include rape and criminal intimidation.‘Assaulted at gunpoint’After the victim’ complaint on September 18, a probe was marked to Inspector General (Crime and Women) Vibhu Raj to look into allegations against Mr. Uppal. “The IG recommended registration of a case. The 26-year-old victim in her statement has said that she was raped twice at gunpoint by the accused,” said Additional Deputy Commissioner of Police, Lakhbir Singh.Mr. Uppal, who is posted in Chandigarh, had earlier termed the allegations as false and baseless.last_img read more

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Confirmed: Vivegam teaser to be out on Ajith Kumar’s birthday

first_imgOne of the most highly expected releases of this year is Thala Ajith Kumar-starrer Vivegam, which is directed by Siruthai Siva. When the makers released the first look poster of Vivegam, it sent fans into a tizzy. Sporting a muscular look, Ajith broke the internet for several reasons.After teasing the fans with stylish pictures of Ajith Kumar, we hear an interesting news regarding the teaser of Vivegam. According to a report in Behindwoods, producer Thiyagarajan of Sathya Jyothi has confirmed that the teaser will be unveiled on Thala’s birthday, as a treat to his fans. Now that’s something exciting, isn’t it?Earlier this month, Siva took to Twitter to share a stylish picture of Ajith, which went viral on the web.Directed by Siva, Vivegam marks Ajith’s third collaboration with the director after the commercial success of Veeram and Vedalam. In the film, Ajith will be seen as a suave Interpol officer.Tipped to be a spy thriller, the film also stars Kajal Aggarwal and Akshara Haasan in important roles, while Bollywood actor Vivek Oberoi will be playing the prime antagonist. Vivegam is expected to release on August 10.Made on a lavish budget, Vivegam was predominating shot in exotic locations.ALSO READ: Baahubali 2 | An emotional SS Rajamouli bids farewell to team on Twitter ALSO READ: Prabhas plays triple role in SS Rajamouli’s Baahubali 2? ALSO READ: After Baahubali 2, Karan Johar to launch Prabhas in Bollywood?last_img read more

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10 months agoChelsea boss Sarri: Ampadu can replace Cahill

first_imgChelsea boss Sarri: Ampadu can replace Cahillby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Maurizio Sarri is happy to promote from within to replace wantaway defender Gary Cahill.Cahill has been linked with a move Southampton as well as several clubs abroad, and Sarri broached the subject of his future at his press conference ahead of the Carabao Cup semi-final first leg tie against Tottenham at Wembley on Tuesday. “His mind is not completely involved in our situation,” said Sarri.”We have to wait. For Cahill, the situation is different. We have (Ethan) Ampadu so we don’t need a replacement.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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14 days ago​Ex-Man Utd striker Berbatov: Messi and Ronaldo would struggle in Solskjaer’s team

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say ​Ex-Man Utd striker Berbatov: Messi and Ronaldo would struggle in Solskjaer’s teamby Freddie Taylor14 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Manchester United striker Dimitar Berbatov has laid into the team, by suggesting that Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo would struggle in it.United are enduring a miserable start to the season that sees them only two points above the relegation zone in the league.They face Liverpool at home in their first game after the current international break.Speaking to Betfair about United, Berbatov explained: “The winter transfer window is going to be difficult and on the pitch Manchester United aren’t producing as a team at the moment. “It doesn’t matter how good you are, Messi or Ronaldo could go there and they would have difficulty because the team is not producing.” last_img read more

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Ultimate Frisbee Is In The Dark Ages Of Analytics — And It

Ultimate should be fertile ground for analytics. The mostly amateur sport first blossomed at universities and remains popular with engineers, computer scientists, mathematicians and teachers — curious, creative nerds eager to break down the sport and share what they learn. Its profile is growing, too. This summer, the International Olympic Committee made the sport eligible to be included in a future Summer Olympics.When I attended the under-23 world tournament in England this summer, I saw hundreds of the sport’s future stars coached by some of its brightest minds, but I also saw a sport missing something vital: detailed data.It’s easy to take sports data for granted in an age when cameras track and quantify the movement of players and balls in baseball, basketball, tennis and soccer. The biggest challenges for analysts in those sports is how to wrangle and make sense of all that data and to get fans to look past traditional box-score numbers.But in ultimate, there are hardly any traditional box-score numbers. Other sports have digitized stat-keeping even at the college or high-school level. But for ultimate, even at a relatively organized and well-run event like the under-23 worlds, the sport’s best young players checked opponents’ scores on schedules filled in by hand. Coaches — including my FiveThirtyEight colleague Jody Avirgan, an assistant coach for the U.S. men’s team — carried clipboards to log who played each point, with paper flapping in the wind and ink blurring in the rain. Players got a glimpse of what wealth can bring to a sport every time they walked past one of Watford FC’s brand-new 500,000 pound ($750,000) fields, but rope fences made clear that the Premier League team’s training ground was off-limits — as were stats as advanced and sophisticated as the EPL’s.At best, ultimate box scores — such as those posted on the under-23 worlds website — contain just goals, assists and Ds (discs knocked down or intercepted). “That is Stone Age material to work with,” said Sean Childers, an ultimate player and co-author of a study on ultimate presented last year at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, in an email. “Imagine a baseball or basketball box score from 50 years ago, but worse.”Ultimate coaches dream of stats corresponding to some of their favorites from other sports. Several wished hockey assists — the pass that leads to the pass for the score — were tracked. Bob Krier, head coach of the U.S. men’s under-23 team, wants to see a shooting percentage for the most difficult passes into the end zone. Others want stats on “pulls,” ultimate’s version of kickoffs: Coaches suspect pulls matter a lot in helping a team set up its defense, both for how long they hang in the air and for where they land.A catch-all metric for player value such as wins above replacement would be nice, too. But Martin Aguilera, who coached the U.S. mixed team at the under-23 championships this year, said, “We’re so far away from that.”Many coaches said they look to basketball for stats they want to see for ultimate. On the surface, ultimate has more in common with football (passing toward a score in an end zone), soccer (a field sport with fluid positions and no play clock) and tennis (starting a point on offense is like serving, and scoring on a defensive point is called breaking). But ultimate has similar defensive principles to basketball, with players switching suddenly from offense to defense and both teams resetting after each score.Plus, basketball has lots of cool data. Ultimate nerds speak with envy and awe about SportVU, the system of cameras that ring NBA arenas and produce data about where the players and ball are at every moment of each game. And they cite the shooting charts of FiveThirtyEight’s Kirk Goldsberry as models for charts they’d love to see, ones that would map success rates for players’ shots at the end zone by field position.Other sports are also seeking better data than their traditional, limited box scores provide. In volleyball, “the official stat sheet is basically useless,” said Todd Dagenais, coach of the University of Central Florida women’s team. He’s seeking better stats to help his team but says there’s a dividend for spectators, too: A smarter sport is more fun to watch. “When an offense is run well, fans love that, which causes the defense to have to make more spectacular moves and more spectacular plays, which is also very entertaining,” he said.Ultimate’s stats are stuck in the Stone Age in part because it takes a lot of work to get not a lot of insight. To improve on the kind of time-consuming, manual stat-keeping process that some coaches at the world championships were using, ultimate players developed an app to track players moving around the field. The Ultiapps Stat Tracker can generate heat maps showing the best scoring spots. Childers and a fellow researcher used data from the app to figure out where those spots are and which players were best at getting the disc there. What they found mostly reinforced basic tenets of the sport, like the importance of keeping the disc in the middle of the field. The heat map above, which is from the paper by Childers and Jeremy Weiss, shows a team’s likelihood of scoring from different points on the field. As a team moves closer and closer to the end zone (at the top of the chart), its chances of scoring increase (the higher the number, the better). The large dip in the 40-percent zone — shown as 0.4 — suggests that a team is just as likely to score from about 50 yards outside the end zone (marked as 20 on the heat map) in the middle of the field as they are from 35 but stuck on the sideline.But data collected at one level of the sport with, say, little wind may not translate into a different level in windy conditions. Partly because of limitations like that one, teams mostly have stopped using the app to collect data.“Teams liked our analysis but found collecting and inputting the data was too onerous to justify the time investment,” Childers said.Part of would-be ultimate analysts’ challenge is that top ultimate players don’t play that many meaningful points1Each game of ultimate is played to a certain number of points, and each team must keep the same group of players on the field until the next point is scored. in a season. Players might play during only eight or 10 points of a game because top teams are deep, usually with more than twice the number of players on the sideline as are on the field at any time. And the roster is rarely the same from tournament to tournament.2Even in an age when ESPN is airing ultimate, no one makes a living playing the sport. Top players often skip tournaments because of personal or job conflicts.Even if everyone could agree on which new stats are needed in a sport like ultimate, a tough question remains: Whose job should it be to collect the stats? Tournaments are mostly run by volunteers focused on tasks such as ensuring players find the right field, have enough water and uphold the sport’s unique spirit of the game during play. That leaves coaches to keep any extra stats they’d want for analysis. But they’re also busy doing lots of other things during tournaments. It’s often easier to collect advanced stats during tryouts or practices instead.For the under-23 tournament, U.K. mixed coaches had to choose 26 players from 93 who showed up at trials. They divided them into six groups and filmed them, rating them in 24 categories. None was scores, assists or Ds. The categories were more subtle: essential but hard-to-measure ultimate and interpersonal skills. One, for example, was “nicehead,” which gauged how well someone played with others. “What we didn’t want to do is pick very skilled players who couldn’t interact with other human beings,” coach Megan Hurst said. She and her fellow coach Felix Shardlow entered all the stats into a big spreadsheet and looked for players whose low ratings came in categories they could easily improve, like catching. Aguilera thinks that more ultimate should be filmed and that more film should be watched. He filmed games at the under-23 worlds from atop a ladder he’d bought for 30 pounds ($45) just before the tournament. Many top college basketball players have seen hundreds of games by the time they get to campus. Incoming college ultimate players might have watched fewer than 20 ultimate games, Aguilera said.Absent data, coaches have to rely on scouting to get ahead. Film analysis has become a hallmark of the best college and club programs in the country. And it was on display at the tournament in England, too.Take, for example, the women’s final between the U.S. and Japan. Mike Whitaker, the head coach of the U.S. team who’d been scouting that Canada-Colombia game with his assistants near the start of the tournament, said that Japan used “advanced scouting more than any other team at the worlds.” The Japanese team brought personnel dedicated to the practice, which played a big role in the final’s outcome. He noticed Japan made adjustments to its defense after its group-stage game against the Americans (the U.S. won 17-13) and scouting other U.S. games.Eri Hirai, Japan’s head coach, said the team tracked which players on other tournament teams threw the most long passes and which ones ran the most. Harai said this kind of scouting is standard practice in Japan. “It’s very important because we knew nothing about other teams before the tournament,” she said in an email interview conducted through a translator. By the end of the tournament, the Japanese team knew enough about the Americans to win the final in a big upset, 17-15. It was the only game any U.S. team lost in the tournament. ST ALBANS, England — On a field 20 miles north of London, three people were camped on the edge of a field wearing USA Ultimate hoodies, notebooks open in front of them. They were the coaches of the U.S.’s under-23 women’s team, and they were scouting two of their biggest Ultimate Frisbee rivals, Canada and Colombia, who were about to play in a group-stage match of the 2015 world championships. The coaches barely even had any data on their own team — but there they were, scrounging for some on their future opponents. Read more: A Plea For More Frisbee Data From A U.S. Ultimate Coach Riley Erickson records video of future opponents for the U.S. mixed team. Carl Bialik Head coach Mike Whitaker and assistant coaches Carolyn Matthews and Lauren Boyle of the U.S. women’s team. Carl Bialik read more

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Inconsistency plagues Buckeyes in New York

It’s tough to say who was colder Thursday night; the students jumping in Mirror Lake or the Ohio State men’s basketball team.In the 2K Sports Classic semifinal game against No. 6 North Carolina, the Buckeyes shot a frigid 9-31 from the field in the first half, en route to a 77-73 loss.“We had a rough first half,” junior guard Jon Diebler said. “If we had come out with a little bit more intensity, the game probably would have been different.”In the second half, the Tar Heels extended their lead and were up 19 points before the Buckeyes finally made a run. Five quick points by Dieber, coupled with two free throws from junior Evan Turner, sparked a 7-0 run. The Buckeyes got as close as two points after a Diebler three-pointer with 15 seconds to go. Carolina’s Larry Drew then made two free throws to end any hope of a miracle, and the Buckeyes were handed a four-point loss. “Obviously we made a great comeback,” coach Thad Matta said. “Finally late in the second half we started making some shots and got a little rhythm to our offense. I’m proud of the way our guys fought back into it, but it obviously wasn’t enough.”The Buckeyes dug themselves too deep of a hole with their first half shooting woes. Though everyone struggled to make shots, it was sophomore William Buford who had the most trouble. Buford made only two of 10 shots in the first half and finished an abysmal 3-16 from the field.In addition to scoring difficulties, Turner struggled to hold onto the basketball. His 23 points led the team, but the Buckeye point guard turned the ball over 10 times.  “Sometimes I might have thought about the situation too much, whether I should shoot or pass, so I traveled here and there,” Turner said. “I just have to make sure it never happens again.”However, Turner and Co. had little time to work out any kinks. OSU played the following day against California in the tournament’s consolation game. Junior center Dallas Lauderdale got his first start of the season against California, completing his return from a preseason hand injury. Lauderdale scored eight points and grabbed four rebounds in 30 minutes of play.More importantly, he anchored the Buckeyes on the defensive end, blocking seven shots. “He gives us a different look both offensively and defensively,” Matta said. “He has pretty good timing. It allows us to do a little bit more on the perimeter knowing he is back there.”Friday’s game had a similar feel to Thursday’s, but with reversed roles. It was the Buckeyes that dominated the majority of the game, and with about 15 minutes to go in the game, they had a 22-point lead. Then, like OSU the night before, California began a comeback. California promptly went on a 17-2 run to cut the Buckeye lead to nine. But on the shoulders of Turner’s 22 second-half points, the Buckeyes were able to hold on and earn a 76-70 victory.  “Basketball is a game of runs,” Turner said. “Fortunately we are mature enough to keep a lead. We handled what we had to handle, and we took care of business.”Turner finished the game with 26 points and 14 rebounds and, along with Diebler and David Lighty, played all 40 minutes. Friday marked the fourth time in as many games that Turner has recorded a double-double. “It has been a good stretch of games,” Turner said. “I am just trying to play hard.”The Buckeyes return to play Lipscomb Tuesday at the Schottenstein Center. read more

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Ohio State footballs Etienne Sabino set to return to lineup start at

While his name is not present on Ohio State football’s official depth chart this week, a familiar face is slated to make his return against Wisconsin on Saturday. Buckeyes coach Urban Meyer said redshirt senior linebacker Etienne Sabino will strap on his pads when OSU makes the trip to Madison, Wis. to play Wisconsin this Saturday, after missing the last four games because of a broken right fibula. “Yeah, I can’t tell you what percent (health) he’s at, but he’s in the starting lineup for the game,” Meyer said. Sabino, who suffered the fracture during the Oct. 6 Nebraska game, needed surgery to fix the damage. In six games before the injury, Sabino recorded 37 total tackles, two sacks, one interception and one forced fumble. Even though he has been out since the first quarter of the contest against the Cornhuskers, missing the last four games, he is tied for the seventh-most total tackles on the team. Senior defensive end John Simon said Sabino’s play in practice hasn’t changed since the injury. “He looks great, you can’t even tell there was ever an injury,” Simon said. When Sabino went out, the defense’s productivity decreased, specifically in scoring defense. In the first six games of the season, OSU’s defense gave up an average of 20.5 points per game. Since Sabino’s injury, however, it has allowed an average of 29 points per game, including the 49 points Indiana scored in Sabino’s first contest out on Oct. 13. Although the first four games were against non-conference opponents perceived to be inferior to Big Ten opponents, the loss of the Miami, Fla., native forced the Buckeyes to pull senior Zach Boren, who once started at fullback, to help fill the void Sabino’s absence left. During an Oct. 15 press conference, Meyer called Boren’s switch from offense to defense “temporarily permanent.” Evem with Sabino’s return, the change is looking more permanent now that Boren was also announced a starter for the upcoming game. “The three that broke the starting lineup today, on Monday, is (sophomore Ryan) Shazier, Zach Boren and Sabino,” Meyer said Monday. As a starting linebacker, Boren has collected 29 tackles and 1.5 tackles for loss. Against Indiana, Boren was the leading tackler for the Buckeye defense. “He’s been a stabling force for our defense,” Meyer said. “One of the most undervalued characteristics of a football team is leadership, and that’s what No. 44 (Boren) gives you.” For the first time this season, Boren, Sabino and Shazier will play together on defense. Boren said he is excited to play with Sabino, but the three are trying to get used to playing as a unit. “I definitely think Ryan’s and my play has elevated because of what Sabino brings to the table,” Boren said. Junior defensive tackle Johnathan Hankins said he believes Sabino brings the same leadership intangible. “He’s one of our key guys that is at the linebacker position. He’s the leader of the defense, so it’s good to have him back,” Hankins said. “I feel like he is going to be at full force and he is going to be ready.” read more

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