Wilmington Social Worker Jennifer Baima Recognized By Care Dimensions

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Care Dimensions joined with the National Association of Social Workers to celebrate National Social Work Month in March.Among those recognized was Wilmington resident and Care Dimensions social worker Jennifer Baima.“Working within an interdisciplinary team, our social workers provide assistance to patients and families as they grapple with the emotional and practical issues that invariably arise from living with an advanced illness,” said Sandra Yudilevich Espinoza, director of Psycho-Social Support Services for the nonprofit organization.All of the social workers at Care Dimensions have earned a master’s degree in social work and have achieved one or two levels of licensure: LCSW or LICSW. And over half of these social workers have earned an advanced certification in hospice and palliative care through the NASW. The major goals of these hospice and palliative care social workers include encouraging expression of feelings, enhancing family communication, supporting the family in their coping, connecting families with community resources and education, and being a supportive presence to the patient and family throughout the journey at end of life.Care Dimensions is largest hospice provider to adults and children with advanced illness in Massachusetts. As a nonprofit, community-based leader in advanced illness care, Care Dimensions provides comprehensive hospice, palliative care, grief support and teaching programs in more than 90 communities in Eastern Massachusetts. Founded in 1978 as Hospice of the North Shore, Care Dimensions cares for patients — in their homes, in long-term care and assisted living communities, in hospitals, at its Kaplan Family Hospice House and, coming in the winter of 2017, at its new Greater Boston Hospice House in MetroWest.(NOTE: The above press release is from Care Dimensions.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington Social Worker Jennifer Baima Recognized By Care DimensionsIn “Business”Wilmington Nurse Tracy Boynton Honored By Care DimensionsIn “Business”Wilmington’s Goodhue Recognized By Child Life Council & Care DimensionsIn “Business”last_img read more

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Standard Chartered plans to sell 44 billion Asian loan portfolio

first_imgLondon-based bank Standard Chartered Plc is planning to sell at least $4.4 billion of assets in Asia. The move is part of a larger effort to clean up its balance sheet and comprises exposure to loans as well as proprietary bond and equity investments in China, Indonesia, India and Malaysia, Bloomberg reported, citing knowledgeable sources. The bank is in talks with potential buyers to sell assets worth $1.4 billion of stressed loans made to Indian companies, including GMR Infrastructure, the agency added.Standard Chartered Plc’s India operations had caused a loss of $981 million (Rs. 6,729 crore) in 2015, while loan impairments of its India portfolio rose sharply to $1.3 billion from $171 million in the previous year.”Corporate and commercial clients’ loan impairment increased significantly to Rs 21,949 crore ($3.2 billion). We have reviewed the portfolio through 2015 and have increased provisioning, largely to reflect lower commodity prices as well as further deterioration in India,” the bank said in its annual report. The reported move to sell Asian loans comes within less than a month of the bank planning to protect its $2 billion exposure to Indian and Belgian diamond traders. The exposure was less than one percent of its total advances, reported Bloomberg, citing sources, and added that the bank would no longer accept receivables as collateral.last_img read more

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Texas Company Recalls Nearly 25 Tons Of Smoked Sausage Items

first_img Share tOrange.bizEddy Packing Co., a Texas company, has recalled nearly 25 tons (23 metric tons) of smoked sausage products due to possible plastic contamination.The U.S. Department of Agriculture released a statement Friday saying the recall involves products with packing dates of April 5 and April 6. The products were shipped to food service and retail locations in California, Georgia, Illinois, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.The problem was discovered when Eddy Packing received complaints from a restaurant about white, hard plastic found in some sausage during slicing. No injuries or illnesses have been reported.The recalled products have “EST. 4800” inside the USDA mark. They should be discarded or returned.The recall includes Eddy Fully Cooked Premium Smoked Sausage, Dickey’s Barbeque Pit Original Smoked Fresh Polish Sausage Made With Pork and Beef, Lowe’s Original Recipe Naturally Hardwood Smoked Sausage Made With Pork and Beef, Eddy Smoked Sausage Made With Pork and Beef, Carl’s Pork and Beef Smoked Sausage, Eddy Southern Style Pork and Beef Smoked Sausage and Dickey Cheese/Jalapeno Pork and Beef Sausage Ring.Labels for FSIS Recall last_img read more

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British engineers report successful test of space penetrator

first_img Citation: British engineers report successful test of space penetrator (2013, July 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-07-british-successful-space-penetrator.html (Phys.org) —British engineers have told reporters that a test of their space penetrator has been conducted and all signs suggest it was a complete success. The space penetrator is a bullet shaped projectile with electronics inside. Its purpose is to hard-land on another planet or moon, penetrating the surface by up to ten feet, then radio back sensor information. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The Galileo spacecraft took this image of Europa, which is about the size of Earth’s moon, in 1996. Credit: NASA. Dual Drill Designed for Jupiter’s Europa Ice In the test, the penetrator was fired at a 10 tonne block of ice—it struck the block moving at approximately 340m/s, which is of course nearly the speed of sound. While the block of ice was reduced to a giant snow-cone, the electronic instruments inside the probe remained intact and in fact, continued to operate as planned, thanks to a spring mechanism engineers crafted to help soften the blow.The main goal of the penetrator is to determine whether life exists on another planet or moon in our solar system. Currently, the hope is that it will be used on Jupiter’s moon Europa, which is believed to be harboring a liquid ocean beneath its icy crust. The penetrator would be carried aboard a more traditional space craft then launched into orbit around a target as part of a satellite. At the appropriate time, a penetrator module would be ejected from the satellite. The module would consist of the penetrator and an engine component to propel the module to a desired location. Once that location is reached, the engine would be released and the penetrator would fall head first down to the surface below. Because of its high speed, it would make its way some distance below the surface before stopping.The researchers report the test penetrator experienced 24,000g as it came to a rest. Once in place, the penetrator would then begin sending sensor data via radio messages to the satellite which would relay them back to Earth.Representatives for the project team told the media that the penetrator could host a wide variety of sensors and could even carry a small drill for taking samples near the probe.The penetrator project is being funded by the European Space Agency, though the agency has yet to decide whether the penetrator will ever actually be deployed. Researchers on the project say it will be ready for launch within a decade’s time. More information: via BBC © 2013 Phys.org Explore furtherlast_img read more

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