Home NewsWatch Blankenship Plans To File For US

first_imgHome NewsWatch Blankenship Plans To File For US Senate On Tuesday Previous PostCollege Football Watch List Update – July 23 Next PostA Controversial Medical Clinic Is Now Seeing Patients Twitter Mail Facebook Linkedin NewsWatchPolitical NewsState NewsTop Stories Blankenship Plans To File For US Senate On Tuesday By Tyler BarkerJul 23, 2018, 21:08 pm 396 0 Tumblr Google+ WEST VIRGINIA (WOAY) – Don Blankenship, the former coal baron who finished third in the West Virginia Republican primary in May, is wading back into the state’s U.S. Senate race, this time attempting to file paperwork to run as a member of the Constitution Party.Blakenship was convicted in 2015 for conspiracy to violate mine safety and health standards in the aftermath of the 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster that resulted in the death of 29 miners.In a statement posted on Facebook, Blankenship conceded that he does not expect the filing to be certified due to West Virginia’s “sore loser” law that prohibits candidates that lost in a primary to run in the general election, but that he believes his name will be on the ballot in November.“The political establishment cannot retroactively enact laws that prohibit individuals who become members of some political parties from being on the ballot while allowing individuals who become members of other political parties to be on the ballot,” Mr. Blakenship wrote Monday.“This is what the Communist or Nazi party would do and is a perfect example of political party behavior that violates an American’s guaranteed right to equal opportunity. It is a clearly discriminatory law and exactly what George Washington warned of in his farewell address,” he continued.In West Virginia’s May 8th Republican primary, Blankenship received just under 20 percent of the vote according to election returns from the West Virginia Secretary of State. Blankenship finished behind Rep. Evan Jenkins, and the ultimate winner, state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey.Morrisey is facing Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin in November in a race that could be crucial to the control of the U.S. Senate.Manchin is one of ten Democrats up for re-election in states that Donald Trump captured in the 2016 election.Representatives for the campaigns of both Manchin and Morrisey did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.According to his statement, Blankenship will attempt to file his campaign paperwork Tuesday afternoon at the West Virginia State Capitol in Charleston.Representatives for the Secretary of State’s office did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment. Pinterest Tyler Barker Tyler Barker is currently the Interim News Director and Digital Content Manager for WOAY-TV. I was promoted to this job in Mid-November. I still will fill in on weather from time to time. Follow me on Facebook and Twitter @wxtylerb. Have any news tips or weather questions? Email me at tbarker@woay.comlast_img read more

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The precious metal equities continue to stink up t

first_imgThe precious metal equities continue to stink up the placeThe short selloff during the first hour of London trading proved to be the low of the Tuesday session, and by 10 a.m. BST the gold price the price jumped back to unchanged from Monday’s close.From that point gold traded sideways until about ten minutes after the 8:20 a.m. EDT Comex open, and the subsequent rally ran out of gas/got capped shortly before 2 p.m. in electronic trading.  The high tick at that point was recorded by Kitco as $1,417.70 spot.  After that, the gold price gave back about five bucks of its gain going into the 5:15 p.m. New York close.Gold finished the Tuesday session at $1,412.20 spot, up $15.70 from last Friday’s close.  Net volume for both Monday and Tuesday combined was reported as 215,000 contracts, which was not overly heavy.The silver price chopped around in a broad 25 cent range either side of unchanged right up until ten minutes after the Comex open, and the subsequent rally topped out about 9:50 a.m. EDT.  The high tick was $24.60 spot. From there it traded more or less sideways until 1 p.m., and then the silver price sold down a bit into the close.Silver closed on Tuesday at $24.28 spot, up 75 cents from the prior Friday’s close.   Volume, net of September and October, over the Monday and Tuesday trading session was reported as 67,000 contracts.Platinum had a nice rally during the New York trading session, and palladium’s minor gains in Europe got taken away by lunch time in New York.  Here are the charts. The dollar index closed on Monday at 82.24 and spent all of Tuesday moving unsteadily higher.  At its 11:30 a.m. EDT zenith, the index painted 82.48.  After that it got sold down a bit going into the close, and it finished the Tuesday trading session at 82.38, up 14 basis points on the day.The gold stocks gapped up about 2 percent at the open, but couldn’t hold those gains despite the fact that gold was in rally mode right up until around 2 p.m. in New York.  The HUI closed up only 0.78%.Despite the stellar gains in silver on Monday and Tuesday, Nick Laird’s Intraday Silver Sentiment Index closed up only 1.43%.  I was underwhelmed.(Click on image to enlarge)The CME’s Daily Delivery Report for Tuesday showed that 21 gold and 15 silver contracts were posted for delivery tomorrow.  JPMorgan was the short/issuer on all 21 gold contracts and 3 of the silver contracts.  I thank reader Jon De Weese for providing this data from his website.There were withdrawals reported in both GLD and SLV yesterday.  Ted Butler and I were both surprised by this, especially Ted, and I know he’ll have more to say about it in his mid-week column later today.  GLD reported a withdrawal of 57,943 troy ounces, and in SLV it was an eye-watering 2,024,820 troy ounces.Yes, there were price declines in both metals late last week, but the withdrawals seem excessive, especially the 2 million ounces out of SLV.As expected, the U.S. Mint had a sales report yesterday.  They sold 1,500 ounces of gold eagles; 500 one-ounce 24K gold buffaloes, and 675,000 silver eagles.  And as I mentioned in Saturday’s column, it’s a near certainty that these sales occurred in August, and were just reported yesterday.Over at the Comex-approved depositories on Friday, they reported receiving 31,813 troy ounces of gold, and shipped 21,211 troy ounces of the stuff out the door.  The link to that activity is here.In silver on Friday, there were 591,540 troy ounces received, and 13,265 ounces shipped out for parts unknown.  The link to that action is here.I have a decent number of stories for you today, so I hope you find some that interest you.Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the clouds of war, it is humanity hanging on a cross of iron. — General Dwight EisenhowerAlthough I was happy to see gold, and particularly silver, do well over the last couple of days, the precious metal equities continue to stink up the place.  They started the day off well again yesterday, but “faded” into the close despite the fact that the underlying metal prices did well, which is a price pattern that we’ve seen a lot of lately, and I’m sort of wondering out loud if this is the free market in action, or possibly something else.  Whatever it is, the shares aren’t confirming the rise in the gold and silver price over the last two or three weeks.I took a quick peek at the preliminary changes in open interest in gold and silver over the last two trading days; up almost 12,000 contracts in gold and a bit over 3,000 contracts in silver.  I’m not overly encouraged by that, but the final numbers should show an improvement.  However, we really won’t know for sure until this Friday’s Commitment of Traders Report is posted on the CFTC’s website, and all of this data will most certainly be in it, as the Comex close yesterday was the cut-off for that report.The price of gold didn’t do much of anything in Far East trading on their Wednesday, and it’s more of the same now that London has been open for about 35 minutes as I write this paragraph.  However, silver got taken down pretty good, from $24.35 spot shortly after 8 a.m. Hong Kong time, all the way down to $23.70 by 2 p.m. in their afternoon, a decline of almost 3 percent.  It made it back to the $24 price mark by the London open.  Gold volume is not overly heavy for this time of day, but it nearly goes without saying that silver’s volume is already very chunky; north of 12,000 contracts.  Platinum and palladium are trading sideways, and the dollar index is flat.And as I hit the send button on today’s column at 5:15 a.m. EDT, both gold and silver are trading lower than they were at the London open.  Gold is now down about 9 bucks, and silver is down 48 cents.  Gold volume is getting up there at 30,000 contracts net, but silver’s volume is only marginally higher than reported in the prior paragraph.  The dollar index is still comatose.I haven’t the foggiest idea what will happen during the New York trading session today, but I’ll be surprised if it passes without incident.That’s all I have for today, which is more than enough, and I’ll see you here tomorrow.last_img read more

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Dear Reader You can earn a higher salary than t

first_imgDear Reader, You can earn a higher salary than the average college graduate by delivering pizzas. Just move to Stanley, North Dakota and reply to this Craigslist ad: Why are these businesses so eager to hire? Because business is booming. And business is booming because they’re near the Bakken, which is at the heart of America’s energy resurgence. It’s good old-fashioned economic stimulus. Oil companies, sensing an opportunity to profit, are luring workers to North Dakota by paying them top dollar. These workers then eat pizza and shop at Walmart. The result is a booming local economy. Notice what is not part of this equation: the government. Contrast North Dakota to the growing list of US cities that are attempting to force wages higher via minimum-wage increases. Seattle passed a minimum-wage increase to $15/hour. San Diego hiked its minimum wage to $11.50/hour. Washington DC’s minimum is rising to $11.50/hour, too. Chicago mayor Rahm Emmanuel wants his city to adopt a $13 minimum wage. Activists in Los Angeles are now calling for a $15 minimum. I could keep going, but you get the picture. There’s all the difference in the world between wages rising because of increased production and a government forcing wages higher by edict. The former is good for everyone. Even though $56K/year plus generous benefits seems expensive for a deliveryman, Jimmy’s is happy to pay it, because the company expects to turn a profit. But when a government outlaws jobs below a certain wage, only a lucky few win. Doug French will elaborate on that point in a minute. First, let’s take a quick look at where this trend is headed. Not only do 63% of Americans favor raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10, Obama already raised it to $10.10 for a lucky subset of Americans. Yes, Congress is deadlocked on whether to raise the minimum wage, but that’s never stopped Barack before. With a stroke of the pen, he issued an executive order raising the minimum for federal contractors to $10.10 beginning in 2015. It’s clear that the federal minimum wage is headed higher. What’s less obvious but equally important is that another, separate increase in the cost of employment is also coming. Remember the “or else” provisions of Obamacare that threaten most employers to either provide health care to their employees or pay a penalty? They kick in by 2016, and they’ll add at least another $1.05/hour to an employer’s cost of hiring an employee. Put it all together, and the minimum cost to hire a worker is likely to jump at least 50% soon, as illustrated by this chart I snagged from the most recent edition of The Casey Report: (Click to enlarge) Then hope Jimmy’s hires you. If you don’t get the job, all is not lost. Plenty of businesses in northwestern North Dakota are offering lucrative pay. Even notoriously stingy Walmart is starting new hires at $17 an hour:center_img The coming “all in” minimum wage of $12.17/hr equates to about $30,000 per year. Which prompts the question: What’s going to happen to the roughly 70 million jobs in America that cost employers less than $30,000 per year? The answer: they’ll disappear. As I mentioned last week, French McDonald’s workers know this all too well. To combat rising labor costs, McDonald’s has been installing kiosks to replace some of its French employees. France’s minimum wage is about $12.12/hour. This trend—the automation of low-skill human labor—is just getting started in America, but it will soon kick into overdrive. As the cost of low-skill human labor becomes prohibitive, businesses will search for mechanized substitutes. And the first call they’ll make is to the automation company we recommend in the newest edition of The Casey Report. If you’ve eaten at TGI Friday’s, used the self-checkout machines at Walmart, or printed a boarding pass at the airport in the last 10 years, you’ve used this company’s labor-saving products. Click here to subscribe to The Casey Report to ride this secular trend with us. Labor-saving automation is the trend of the future, and now’s the time to get positioned. I’ll now pass the baton to Doug French to continue the minimum-wage discussion. Then you’ll find a fun story from subscriber N P Chaudhri about a lucrative scam created by a communist cab driver.last_img read more

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Items can be dropped off at any Alabama One Credit

first_imgItems can be dropped off at any Alabama One Credit Union Branch in Tuscaloosa and Pickens Counties. Then this weekend, Two Men and a Truck will gather them and deliver them to Pickensville residents.“They need the items to be dropped off at the fire department,” Burroughs said. “That’s where all of the items are going to be for the residents to come and pick up.”Donations will be accepted at Alabama One Credit Union until March 15. Any questions can be directed to Chelsea Burroughs at (205) 409-8779 or chelsea@capitolparktitle.com Reporting by WVUA 23 Reporter Andrea MateiHeavy rain at the beginning of the month caused water levels at the Tombigbee River at Bevil Lock and Dam to rise, causing major flooding in Pickens County.Residents are still working to clean up their homes. But, Tuscaloosa residents can contribute to a local organization’s efforts to help the community.“I know I’ve had a leak in my house and I can’t imagine having the entire lower part of my house flooded,” Chelsea Burroughs, the vice president of the Disaster Relief for Young Leaders Society, said.To help out residents in Pickensville, the Young Leaders Society of United Way of West Alabama is partnering with Alabama One Credit Union to collect supplies needed for residents to clean their homes. The things people dealing with flood damage need most are cleaning supplies.“You just start thinking about getting Febreeze, getting bleach, getting supplies, getting rubber gloves, getting squeegies,” Burroughs said. “And for any of the damage that was caused by trees, we might need axes, chainsaws, ShopVacs. Those would be perfect.”OTHER ITEMS NEEDED IN PICKENS COUNTY:DetergentGlovesScrub padsTowelsRopeBasic toolslast_img read more

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PANAMA CITY AP — US coach Jeff Van Gundy came

first_imgPANAMA CITY (AP) — U.S. coach Jeff Van Gundy came into the start of this second round of qualifying for the FIBA Basketball World Cup cautioning his players that they would face enormous challenges.They clearly heeded his words, and the Americans are now closing in on a trip to China next year.Reggie Hearn scored 12 points, Dwayne Bacon added 10 and the U.S. easily got past Panama 78-48 in a qualifying game Monday night. The Americans have won both of their second-round qualifying games so far, winning them by a combined 87 points.“It’s just an honor to be able to go to another country and wear this jersey,” said U.S. forward Henry Ellenson of the Detroit Pistons. “It’s just something really special and I love doing it. I was so excited to get the invite. This was a blast and a hell of an experience.”The U.S. outrebounded Panama 50-34, held the hosts to 31 percent shooting and trailed for only 67 seconds in the early moments. Van Gundy went to his bench early and often, rotating players throughout in part because of a steamy feel inside the arena named for Panama’s boxing legend Roberto Duran.“I think our greatest strength is our depth,” Van Gundy said. “Again, we’ve pretty much done this throughout. We play 10 or 11 guys, anywhere from 10 or 11 minutes up to the low 20s. We try to take advantage of our depth. Tonight, the crowd was good, but it was warm in there.”And now, Nov. 29 — the next day of qualifying games in the Americas Region — sets up as enormous.The U.S. and Argentina are tied atop Group E with 7-1 records and will play that day with outright control of first place in the group standings up for grabs. Uruguay and Puerto Rico will meet that same day, each entering with 5-3 records, meaning the loser there will be three games behind the U.S.-Argentina winner with three games left in qualifying.The top three teams in Group E are guaranteed spots at the World Cup, which starts in China on Aug. 31.After the way they played Monday, it seems like only a staggering collapse would keep the Americans from qualifying.The U.S. used a 16-0 run — needing only about two minutes — in the fourth quarter to turn what was a relatively one-sided game into an even bigger rout. Chasson Randle, Hearn and Travis Trice all made 3-pointers to get that spurt going, and Ben Moore’s layup with 6:30 left gave the Americans a 73-40 lead.“It feels great. It moves us that much closer to qualifying,” Hearn said. “It moves us that much closer to the U.S. getting to the World Cup and getting the whole thing.”The U.S. got an ideal start in a hostile arena, running out to a 16-3 lead as Panama opened 1 for 11 from the field.The Americans were in control throughout, though there was a brief stretch late in the first half where the U.S. grip on things seemed to slip ever so slightly. Panama got within 31-23 with 2:04 left in the half on a jumper by Tony Bishop Jr. before Hearn and White combined to score the final five points before the break and send the Americans into intermission with a 13-point lead.When the second half started, the U.S. resumed pulling away. Frank Mason, Dakari Johnson and Bacon scored the first six points of the third quarter, and the Americans’ lead was quickly pushed out to 42-23.TIP-INSUSA: USA Basketball teams are 21-1 against Panama, when counting play at all international levels. … No U.S. player has scored more than 17 points in any of the eight qualifying games. … Ellenson finished with 11 rebounds, one shy of the most by any U.S. player so far in the qualifying rounds.Panama: Javier Carter led the hosts with 16 points. … CJ Rodriguez finished with 13 points.REACHING CHINAThe September window of games closed with seven of the 32 spots for the FIBA Basketball World Cup filled.China automatically qualified as the host nation. Nigeria and Tunisia claimed two available spots out of the African Qualifiers with wins on Saturday. And four European teams — the Czech Republic, Germany, Greece and Lithuania — all had clinching wins either Sunday or Monday.OTHER GAMESThere were two games in the other group of Americas Qualifiers on Sunday, one going down to the final buzzer and the other never getting started. Venezuela (7-1) topped the Dominican Republic (5-3) 79-78, and Brazil (6-2) was credited with a 20-0 win over the Virgin Islands (2-6) in a forfeit — the Virgin Islands team didn’t make its flights to Brazil. Also in Group F, Canada (7-1) topped Chile (1-7) on Monday, 84-61.All six Group E teams in the Americas were in action Monday. Besides the U.S. win, Uruguay beat Mexico (3-5) 63-60, and Argentina defeated Puerto Rico 106-84.UP NEXTUSA: Visit Argentina on Nov. 29.Panama: Host Mexico on Nov. 29.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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Every evening after dinner Herman Agbavor and his

first_imgEvery evening after dinner, Herman Agbavor and his 5-year-old son Herbert have a ritual. Little Herbert climbs into his dad’s lap, unzips his book bag and they go over his kindergarten homework.The two of them have been doing some variation of this homework routine since Herbert was 1. That’s when Agbavor first enrolled the boy in preschool.They live in a working-class neighborhood of Ghana’s capital city Accra — in a cement block apartment in a multifamily house that’s got a television and lots of books but no indoor plumbing.A few minutes into their session on a recent evening, they get to a page with instructions to trace some rectangles. The boy falters.”T-R-A-C-E,” says the father. “What does it spell?””Te?” offers Herbert in a small voice.”You’ve got to learn how to read,” Agbavor says intently. “It’s very important. I’m not supposed to be reading for you all the time!”Share your story on your school experiences. In Ghana right now there’s a lot riding on getting your child to read by age 5. No one can pinpoint precisely when these expectations started. But there’s a widespread sense that Africa is rising. Just last year Ghana ranked among the world’s fastest growing economies. And like many parents, Agbavor is convinced that all sorts of jobs could be opening up for people who know things — skills like speaking English and working with computers. And so there’s a trend here. Parents — even those with very low incomes — are putting their children in private schools at younger and younger ages.This hope around preschool is something you see around the world. In rich and poor countries alike there’s a recognition that quality preschool can give children an invaluable start in life. And in the U.S. there’s a major push underway to get more children enrolled. But in Accra — and in fact in many fast-growing African cities — they’ve already achieved that. It’s estimated that in Accra by the time children reach age 3, 80 percent of them are in preschool, twice the share in the United States.But there is a problem with this picture. The government has tested Ghana’s children as they move on to elementary school. It has found that the preschool boom is not fulfilling its promise. To cite just one statistic, among second graders tested in city schools one-third could not read a single word of a simple story. The results on basic arithmetic questions are similarly disappointing.In short, when it comes to preschool in Ghana, “children are not actually getting anything from it,” says Sharon Wolf, a professor of early childhood development at the University of Pennsylvania. “They are not actually learning.”Wolf is one of several experts the government has turned to in an attempt to address this problem. Three years ago officials asked her and several collaborators — including an international research group called Innovations for Poverty Action — to set up an experiment aimed at overhauling Accra’s preschools: A training program to get the teachers to completely rethink their approach to teaching.And at first the experimental training program was remarkably effective. But then the effort ran into a wall. The very people who are most desperate for Ghana’s kids to succeed — the moms and the dads — started getting in the way.A Teacher’s QuestFour hundred and forty-four teachers were selected for the training experiment. One of them happens to be Herbert’s current teacher, a 41-year-old with a round face and a beaming smile named Godaiva Gbetodeme.She was a particularly eager recruit — because she had been trying to figure out how to be a better teacher for years.Gbetodeme had gotten into teaching more than two decades earlier, at age 20, mainly because she needed a job. Her mother had died and she needed to support her younger siblings. She didn’t have any special skills, just the rough equivalent of a high school degree.”So I had to hustle here and there,” she says chuckling. And she had noticed there were all these preschools popping up around the neighborhood, most of them privately run. The owners didn’t care that she had no teaching credentials. Few of Ghana’s preschool teachers do.But what started as just a job had almost immediately turned into a calling for Gbetodeme. She just loved being around the children: “I realized that’s what God has planned for me.”And to her that meant she shouldn’t just wing it as a teacher. “I have to get into it fully.”She tried getting advice on how to be a good teacher from the owners of a succession of preschools she worked at. Their answer was invariably: “more homework.” As in: “Why don’t you give the children three homework [assignments]. Why don’t you give them four?”And that is what the parents seemed to want. They would open their child’s backpack in front of her, she recalls, “and say ‘Oh! there’s no homework in my child’s bag.’ So I would say, ‘Don’t worry. We will double the homework for your child on Monday.'”Gbetodome says her next attempt to learn how to be a teacher was a kind of spy operation. “Yes,” she says, giggling, “don’t laugh at me.” She had noticed that there was another preschool not far from her home that charged three times as much tuition as the school she was teaching in. Maybe she could learn something from them, she thought. So “I went there in a pretend manner” — masquerading as a parent to get the headmistress to show her around.And she was blown away by what she saw.”I was like, oh wow!” she remembers.Gbetodome’s own classroom was a spartan place — with bare cement walls, not a single poster for the children to look at. This expensive school’s classroom was filled with books and toys.”Legos in different shapes and sizes,” she recalls.Gbetodome tried to make the case to her own headmaster that they should buy things like this for her classroom. She says he told her, this is a school for working-class parents. We don’t have those kind of resources.”There is no money,” she recalls. “They always complain that there is no money in my school.”And so, Gbetodome returned to her classroom defeated. It wasn’t until the researchers came along that she would find out there was something she could do to dramatically improve her classroom — a missing ingredient that wouldn’t require money but rather a fundamental re-conception of how she should relate to her students.’Chew And Pour’Before launching the experiment to train teachers, Sharon Wolf, the researcher from the University of Pennsylvania, ran some tests on groups of preschoolers to figure out how much they know.”One way is by showing a picture and asking children to tell you what they see,” she notes. For instance a landscape with lots of animals. Then, you count the number of words the kids say as a way to gauge their vocabulary skills.But when Wolf tried this common test with Ghana’s preschoolers, “we would just get blank stares.” If the tester pointed to a specific animal the child could name it. But when the kids were asked, just generally, what do you see, they were stuck. They did not know how to offer their own observations and opinions in answer to an open-ended question.”It became very clear that children are not really getting opportunities to do this in school,” says Wolf. And as Wolf started visiting Accra’s preschool classrooms it became clear that this was the result of a very particular style of teaching.We get a sense of what this approach looks like on a recent morning when we walk into one of the preschools Wolf has been studying just as class is about to begin.About 40 toddlers take their place at rows of wood tables. Their teacher walks to the front of the room and turns to face them. “Attention!” she calls out crisply. The children rise as one, snapping their hands to their sides.Almost immediately the teacher launches into a vocabulary lesson in English — the language used by officialdom in Ghana but not the language spoken in these children’s homes. “Shoe!” she shouts, holding up a flashcard with a picture of a shoe. “Shoe!” the kids shout back. “Shoe! Shoe! Shoe!”Next up, a picture of a nose. “Nose!” shouts the teacher. “Nose! Nose! Nose!” shout the children.Then it’s time for Roman numerals.It looks academically rigorous, but there’s a serious deficiency, says Margaret Okai, the government education official in charge of Ghana’s preschool and elementary schools.The teachers are exclusively focused on rote memorization. “When you enter their classroom you realize they are not able to engage the children. They’d rather stand in front of the children,” she says — lecturing to the students and making the children repeat it back.When we describe the scenes we’ve been seeing in Accra’s preschools to Herman Agbavor — the father who was doing homework with his son Herbert, he immediately nods in recognition. “Back in school we used to call it chew and pour,” he says. Meaning, for each possible question the teacher gives you one correct answer to memorize — or “chew” — so that come test time, you can regurgitate it — “pour it” back to her verbatim.”And then,” adds Agbavor with a chuckle, “you forget about it. Nothing is retained.”People in Ghana laugh about chew and pour because it’s always been this way. It’s not something they expect to change. They complain about it the way Americans gripe about standardized testing or how children are given the whole summer off to forget everything they learned during the year.But the consensus among researchers and government officials is that at least in preschools, there’s an urgent need to scrap this method. Instead of forcing kids to stare at a chalkboard or a flashcard, Okai says, teachers need to come up with hands-on activities using objects that children can touch and manipulate. And most crucially, agrees Wolf, instead of training them to spit out set answers to a list of questions, teachers need to ask open-ended questions that “draw out children’s ability to think and reason.”This was the missing ingredient in Gbetodeme’s classroom.No KnockingSo how do you turn a chew-and-pour teacher into a different kind of educator?The experimental training program that Wolf designed took place three years ago. It consisted of a week of intensive instruction, followed by two shorter refresher courses and monthly classroom visits from a coach over the course of a year. And it was chock-full of practical tips — activities teachers could use to get students to express themselves.But for Gbetodome the most important takeaway was deeper. Sitting at the training center, she began to realize that if she wanted children to really answer, and not just give blank stares, she didn’t just have to ask different questions. She would have to become a different kind of teacher.”I learned that as a teacher I should be approachable. I should be their friend,” she says. Meaning she needed to get on the children’s level — even literally.”Like if they sit on the floor, I sit on the floor with them.”Until the trainers suggested this, Gbetodeme says it would never have occurred to her to interact with her students this way.”I felt that, ‘I’m the teacher. You are my students. I’m educating you,'” she says.In other words, her role was to be the authority figure — to command respect.At first she was skeptical. This idea of asking kids questions about their thoughts and feelings and waiting for them to answer — that might work in the United States, she thought. But “this is Ghana. We are supposed to handle kids our own way.”A child shouldn’t be the one to initiate a conversation with an adult. Kids shouldn’t look adults in the eye even. You were supposed to be afraid of teachers.”It’s part and parcel of us,” she says.She remembers a time one of her own teachers knocked her in the head. She was 16-years-old. He was the French teacher. He caught her trying to sneak a few peppers out of the cafeteria.”I had a severe headache for two days,” she says.When she became a teacher, she followed the French teacher’s example.”Let me be frank,” she says, “I knocked their heads. When they would do something bad I’d just …” She gives the table a hard rap.But in the experimental training program the instructors made the case against intimidation by bringing up brain science.”When we’re scared,” says Wolf, “those parts of our brain that can absorb information and are used in learning actually shut down.”And sitting there, Gbetodeme started to rethink all the experiences she’d had. “It kept flashing back into my brain.”Like that time the French teacher had knocked her in the head. It wasn’t just physically painful, she says. It was humiliating. She wasn’t allowed to leave the cafeteria until lunch was over. So in front of everyone she put her head down on the table, “and I wept.” Soon after she dropped his class. She never studied French again. “I didn’t even want to see his face. I hate him up until today,” she says.And reflecting on that memory, Gbetodeme realized that several years earlier she had done the same thing to one of her own students. A boy named Chris “was doing something naughty,” she says, “I don’t remember exactly what.” So she hit him hard. Now when she runs into him she sees the same hatred in his eyes that she feels toward her French teacher.”That boy,” Gbetodeme says sadly, “will not forgive me.”All those years that she had been following the traditional script, “I realized that I had been harming the children.” Gbetodeme came out of the training and made a vow to herself. She would never lay a hand on a child again. Never even intimidate a kid. It was going to be a different kind of space in her classroom. A different kind of Ghana.A Classroom TransformedWalk into Gbetodeme’s class today and the contrast with the typical preschools around the neighborhood is remarkable.Her room is awash in color. Every inch of the cement walls are covered with posters with numbers and words and animals. There’s a pretend shop filled with empty food boxes and household supplies where children can “buy” the items with pretend money. The training program taught her how to use everyday supplies to make teaching materials. Bottle caps, cardboard boxes, “even the tube inside the toilet [paper] roll,” she says.But the most notable difference is how Gbetodome treats her students. Gone is the knocking. She never even yells — just calls them to attention with a cheerful “Hello!” or a ring of a bell.And if they occasionally misbehave — she talks it through with them. When a boy shoves Herbert as they wait to wash their hands, she says firmly but soothingly: “Michael, why do you like fighting? We say children of God should not fight. Say sorry to him.””Sorry,” mumbles little Michael.There are still a few chew and pour exercises. But throughout the day Gbetodeme finds all sorts of ways to engage the kids in open-ended conversations.It starts with calling the children to a poster with faces on it — one happy, another sad, another angry, another surprised and so on. The children take a sticker with their name on it and place it under the face that reflects how they feel in that moment.Herbert puts his name under the grinning face. “Why are you happy?” asks Gbetodeme.”Because my mother will buy me a toffee,” he exclaims.”Oh!” says Gbetodeme, laughing. “Will you be bringing me some of the toffee?””Yes,” he says shyly as the other children giggle.The Preschool ParadoxGbetodeme is not an outlier. Across the board, Wolf found that this short, very basic program prompted teachers to substantially change their teaching practices. Best of all that change translated into better learning outcomes for their students — who scored higher on tests of pre-literacy, pre-numeracy and social emotional skills than children taught by a control group of teachers who did not get the training.”That was the thing that really floored me,” says Wolf. She also found that of all the various changes the teachers made — like more hands-on activities and no corporal punishment — what made the most difference in the children’s performance on academic tests was when teachers engaged in the open-ended questioning.This suggests something of a paradox: Ghana’s chew-and-pour classrooms may be unsuccessful at teaching early reading and math precisely because they are so squarely focused on teaching this material. And the teachers in the training program had more success at getting children to read and do math precisely because they moved away from such a strong focus on outcomes and focused instead on the process — basically building up the thinking and reasoning skills that children need to learn.”We didn’t train the teachers on how should you be teaching the alphabet,” notes Wolf. “We just trained the teachers on how to make their classrooms more child-friendly.”But then the experiment ran into an unexpected obstacle.Herman’s Hopes … And FearsHerman Agbavor says he enrolled his son, Herbert, in preschool at such an early age because he himself didn’t have that opportunity.Agbavor is stuck in a job he doesn’t love. And he thinks it’s because he didn’t get the right start. He would have liked to be a doctor, he says. Most recently he’s been working toward getting certified as an airplane mechanic. But right now he’s working at the airport, filling out paperwork on the planes that come in.For his son, “I would love for him to be a doctor or a pilot or a pastor,” Agbavor muses. But most important, he says, is that Herbert get to choose his passion. The thought that this future is within Herbert’s grasp fills Agbavor with hope. But also with anxiety.Because right now Herbert is not reading at the pace Agbavor thinks he should. He knows his alphabet, “but when it comes to reading a full word, he’s messing up,” says Agbavor. The realization feels like a punch to the gut for Agbavor. Herbert is only five years old, and already Agbavor worries he may be failing him.So earlier this Agbavor stopped by Gbetodome’s classroom to make a request.”He told me I should lash his son for him,” recalls Gbetodeme.She considers the boy eager to please and generally well-behaved. And yet here was his father looming before her, giving her this message.”He said, ‘Lash Herbert for me. He’s naughty. He’s not learning.'”Agbavor says he was just trying to “give her confidence” to get Herbert to buckle down more — and to let Gbetodeme know that he wouldn’t complain if she needed to put the boy in line.But Gbetodeme says it felt like criticism. And in that moment — despite all her vows to be a different sort of teacher, one who no longer relies on intimidation — she slipped a little.She says she called out to the boy: “Herbert, did you hear? Did you hear what your daddy told me to do to you?'” And she says, Herbert, normally so full of pep, “he became kind of timid.”As slips go, it was not hugely dramatic. But it’s telling because of another — less hopeful — finding from Wolf’s experiment. In addition to the group of teachers that got the training (Gbetodeme’s group), Wolf created another group, training the teachers but also bringing in parents of their students to see a video on the importance of activity-based learning and encouraging them to be more involved in their children’s education.Here’s what she found: The teachers in that group didn’t change their teaching style to engage the children in open-ended conversations. And the children didn’t make gains in test scores.Why this happened is a bit of a puzzle. But Wolf found what she thinks was a clue. In some follow-up interviews she did with both parents and teachers, it appeared that the training program made parents more prone to complain about their children to the teachers — to say things along the lines of what Agbavor told his son’s teacher. Wolf hypothesizes that giving up the chew-and-pour approach “was really going out on a limb” for these teachers. So in the face of even indirect pushback from parents, the child-centered approach “was the natural thing for teachers to step back on.”The Worries Of A One-Eyed ManAgbavor seems genuinely surprised to learn that Gbetodeme took his instruction to her as a criticism. He also was not aware that she had had the experimental training. He hadn’t even realized she was using a new approach in her classroom. He’s never actually observed her in action.When I fill in him, he’s intrigued.It would be great for teachers to give kids more opportunities for hands-on learning, he says.”I believe in the practical,” he says. “If you just have theory and you can’t practice, it’s useless.”But as we discuss how he, as a parent, can make sure that Herbert’s teachers do better, he reverts to the same focus on outcomes — on the trappings of learning — that gave rise to chew and pour.”It’s step by step,” he says. First the child needs to know the alphabet, “then from that to form sentences.””And If I tell [the teachers], by the end of this year he should be writing then they’ll know that.” They’ll make it happen.He doesn’t see how he can let up on his focus on results. He can’t just step back and put his faith in the school.”Herbert is my first son,” he says. “I don’t want him to regret in the future that, ‘my father couldn’t do the right thing for me.’ “Agbavor brings up an expression in his language, Ewe: “If you’re a one-eyed man, you don’t play with sand.” It could get in your eye and “you don’t have an eye to spare. A one-eyed man doesn’t play with sand.” SHARE YOUR STORY: Kids and parental pressureAs a parent, did you ever push your child in ways you now regret – or not push them enough? Or when you were a child, did you ever feel pushed too hard or not enough? Share your story in the tool below. We are collecting responses until June 27. We may feature your post on NPR. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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A new report shows North Carolina has the nations

first_imgA new report shows North Carolina has the nation’s second highest increase in opioid deaths. A study from the Centers For Disease Control estimates that just over 2,500 people in North Carolina overdosed on opioids and other drugs in 2017. That’s a nearly 22 percent increase from the year before.The CDC says that of those overdoses, nearly 2,300 deaths were reported, but that number is expected to rise due in part to autopsy delays. Public officials tell the News and Observer that the rise is due in part to the rapid spread of synthetic fentanyl, which is cheaper and more potent than heroin.The black market is also seeing a spike in fentanyl “analogues,” which are drugs created to imitate the effects of fentanyl. The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services says there are at least 42 types of these copycat drugs on the market, many of which are being mixed in with heroin, cocaine and other painkillers.The skyrocketing pace of drug overdoses in North Carolina mirrors a national trend. The state with the steepest rise in overdose deaths in 2017 was Nebraska, with a nearly 33 percent increase.last_img read more

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When photographer Nico Therin came across pictures

first_imgWhen photographer Nico Therin came across pictures of wrestling matches on the sand in Senegal, he was so intrigued he decided to take his camera and go. It didn’t take long for Therin to learn that in Senegal, wrestling is a national sport. As Khadim Gadiaga, president of the Senegalese Wrestlers Association, puts it, “Every Senegalese — mothers and fathers, even the president of the republic — they love Senegalese wrestling.”During his visit to Dakar this spring, Therin saw that enthusiasm manifest itself in kids wrestling in the streets after school. And in the hours before sunset he observed beaches fill with both kids and adults, professionals and amateurs, wrestling on the soft sand. Yes, on the sand. Even in stadiums, where professional matches take place before large crowds, the “ring” is a rectangle of sand, says Therin, 30, who was born in France and is now based in Los Angeles. As the wrestlers go at it, the sand settles on their skin, like a layer of grit. When they fall to the ground, the sand also cushions them. The sport has a long history in Senegal. The traditional form of Senegalese wrestling, “without blows,” has existed for centuries, says Thierno Ka, vice-president in charge of Olympic Wrestling and Communications at the Comité National de Gestion de Lutte. “Without blows” means “people can’t hit each other with their hands,” explains sports journalist Oumar Diarra.Champion wrestlers from different villages would compete against each other as part of celebrations after a good harvest. Starting in the 1930s, a different form of wrestling “with blows” became popular. It’s “more like boxing and wrestling mixed together,” says Diarra. In recent decades television broadcasts and commercial sponsorships have brought greater visibility and enlarged fan bases for the sport, he says, including youthful wrestlers hoping to find financial success in the ring. Therin gained entrance to Senegal’s wrestling culture with the help of one of the country’s most famous champions, Lut Pathe Boy. Popularly known as Big Pato, he is also a policeman, with a T-shirt that sports dual photos of him in his police uniform and his wrestling gear, and the caption, “Le Flic de l’Arene,” which Therin translated as “The Cop of the Arena.””He told me, ‘I get up in the morning to serve others,'” says Therin. “Without him I could not have photographed this work.” Diane Cole writes for many publications, including The Wall Street Journal and The Jewish Week, and is book columnist for The Psychotherapy Networker. She is the author of the memoir After Great Pain: A New Life Emerges. Her website is dianejcole.com. Ricci Shryrock, a photojournalist based in Senegal, contributed to this report. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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Plastic garbage from Trader Joes and an AARP card

first_imgPlastic garbage from Trader Joe’s and an AARP card are peeking out of hillocks of plastic trash piling up in Indonesia.It’s a sign of a new global quandary: What should wealthy countries do with their plastic waste now that China no longer is buying it?For years, America sold millions of tons of used yogurt cups, juice containers, shampoo bottles and other kinds of plastic trash to China to be recycled into new products.And it wasn’t just the U.S. Some 70 percent of the world’s plastic waste went to China – about 7 million tons a year.Numerous Chinese millionaires were minted as recycling businesses started and blossomed – sure, they paid for the world’s plastic and paper trash but they made far more money from processing it and selling the resulting raw materials.But last year the Chinese government dropped a bombshell on the world recycling business: They cut back almost all imports of trash. And now a lot of that plastic gets shipped to other countries that don’t have the capacity to recycle it or dispose of it safely.To understand the current dilemma, we have to go back in time a couple of decades.A Billionaire Is BornIn 1995, Zhang Yin started a paper recycling company in China called Nine Dragons. She would become China’s first female billionaire. China wanted scrap paper and plastic to recycle into more products, and Yin seized the market. Martin Bourque runs one of the oldest recycling operations in the U.S. as part of the Ecology Center in Berkeley, California. “There were brokers going around the globe buying up every scrap of plastic they could find and paying top dollar for it,” he says.And there was this brilliant tactic to increase profits: West Coast ports in the U.S. were full of empty Chinese shipping containers that had come to deliver goods to American consumers. “So it made a lot of sense to send [waste] out though the port in an empty ship that was going back anyway,” says Bourque.For American recyclers, it was too good a deal to pass up. Many types of plastic — bags, cups, plastic wrap, thin film — gum up sorting machines at materials recovery centers in the U.S. and is of almost no value to recyclers.Waste expert Joe Dunlop at the Athens-Clarke County materials recovery facility near Athens, Georgia, explained the problem to me. We watched conveyer belts deliver tons of trash every hour, with magnets diverting metal and paper going into bins for recycling. Some plastic is binned up too, if it’s recyclable — bottles, for example. But the rest, like a box covered in film plastic – thin flexible sheets of plastic — is not easy to recycle.He pulls up a two-foot-square piece of cardboard out of a ten-foot-pile of trash. “A cardboard box wrapped in our number one contaminate, film plastic,” he says. “That’s just bad. What is so awful about a cardboard box that they had to go and do this to it?”The cardboard/plastic combo originally held beverages. “but have you ever had to unpackage containers? It’s a pain in the butt.”Dunlop says a lot of that plastic is hopeless when it comes to recycling in the United States. It mostly ended up in landfills, until China came along.China had plenty of capacity to handle plastics and lots of cheap laborers to sort the recyclable materials from the non-recyclable. By 2016, the U.S. was exporting almost 700,000 tons a year to China alone. Overall, China imported 7 million tons from around the world.About five years ago, the Chinese government started to worry about all this trash coming in. A lot of the plastic was contaminated with stuff that made it difficult and expensive to recycle – paper, food waste, plastic wrap (which is not recyclable). And some of the plastic was hard to recycle and thus not profitable to import.What’s more, a lot of plastic sneaked in illegally, without permits. These fly-by-night recyclers dumped stuff they couldn’t recycle, causing pollution on land and in waterways.In fact, Martin Bourque actually tracked some of the plastic scrap from his operation in Berkeley. In 2016, he buried a GPS transponder in one of his bales of paper and plastic waste from the Ecology Center. Waste brokers bought it. He followed the transponder’s electronic signals to a town in China. Bourque then contacted local residents to document what happened to it. They reported to Bourque what they saw. “And what we found confirms some of our worst nightmares: dumping in the local canyon of materials they couldn’t recycle, plastic in the farmland incorporated into the soil of the cornfields nearby,” he says.China Says NoSo the Chinese government cracked down.In 2017 the government started to cut way back on plastic trash imports. Then the big bombshell: In January 2018, they banned almost all imports. Last year, China took in less than one percent of its 2016 total.That means a huge amount of plastic is looking for a place to go. Especially, says Bourque, in the western U.S. where communities depended heavily on the Chinese trade.”A lot of it is being stockpiled,” he says, “you know, people who have warehouse space.” Many communities — like Eugene, Oregon — temporarily stopped collecting things like yogurt containers and shampoo bottles that used to go to China.Keefe Harrison runs a non-profit called the Recycling Partnership that works to improve recycling rates. She says more plastic in the U.S. is now ending up in landfills or getting incinerated, which creates pollution. And she says the confusion is discouraging to consumers. “It’s very hard to turn recycling on and off,” she says. “You can’t tell your citizens ‘Today we’re not recycling any more, but next week we’ll start again’.”Harrison says if recyclers in the U.S. are going to pick up the slack, they need help: For one thing, they need more good, valuable plastic — bottles and tubs like the ones detergent comes in, for example, that are easier to recycle into raw plastic they can resell in the U.S. “The truth is that only half of Americans can recycle at home as easily as throwing something away,” she says. “So that’s step one that we have to fix.”New DestinationsMeanwhile, shipments of plastic waste to other Southeast Asian countries have skyrocketed. Exports from the U.S. to Thailand jumped almost 7,000 percent in one year. Malaysia’s went up several hundred percent. Those numbers dropped in 2018 after those countries cut back on imports. Stiv Wilson is an environmental activist and documentary film-maker who works with a project on waste called The Story of Stuff. He’s also been working with an environmental group called Ecoton in Indonesia, another big importing country. Wilson visited a town near a recycling plant in the city of Surabaya. The plant takes paper bales mixed with plastic.”That plastic gets separated by the paper factory,” he says. “It gets dumped in the neighboring community and then the only way to get rid of it is to openly burn it. It is also used as fuel for boiling water to make tofu in small tofu factories all around …. air, water and land (are) all affected by this.”And he’s the one who’s documented uniquely American items that indicate where a lot of the trash comes from: “Like AARP cards with names on them. So obviously you know where that’s come from.”These new dumping destinations aren’t likely to last. Already, Vietnam and Malaysia are cutting back imports of scrap plastic because they are overwhelmed. They can’t handle the huge diversion of plastic to their countries since China shut out imports.Recycling experts say it’s a time of reckoning for their industry – and that wealthy countries need to stop exporting to countries that can’t handle it. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

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Discovery World has received a 2 million gift fro

first_imgDiscovery World has received a $2 million gift from the We Energies Foundation to develop a new energy experience exhibition at its museum on the lakefront in downtown Milwaukee.The new exhibit, called Power On, is set to open in October and will include multiple interactive exhibits allowing guests to generate energy and explore energy concepts that affect everyday life.Visitors will be able to reach out and touch lightning, explore how wind turbines work, discover how to meet the energy needs of a city, play with invisible light energy and experiment with gravitational potential energy. A video rendering of the exhibit is available here. “We are pleased and excited to partner with Discovery World to invite families and students to interact with the vital force that powers their daily lives,” said Beth Straka, vice president of the We Energies Foundation and senior vice president of corporate communications and investor relations at We Energies parent WEC Energy Group. “We’re hoping Power On inspires the next generation of engineers and innovators who will be integral to the success of our industry.”Discovery World is also developing a new STEM-based, energy-focused educational curriculum with We Energies and other community partners to complement the exhibit.“The energy experience will allow guests to engage in all kinds of physical activities that are connected to the most important topics and concepts around energy,” said Joel Brennan, president and chief executive officer of Discovery World. “This powerful, often unseen force will become better understood and appreciated through these highly interactive experiences.”Discovery World is undergoing an $18 million expansion project, which will add nearly 20,000 square feet to the museum. The first phase, expected to be completed this summer, will add a 10,000-square-foot pavilion to take the place of the seasonal tent pitched each spring and summer on the north lawn of the lakefront museum. The second phase of the project involves remodeling major exhibit space and doubling the available exhibit and program space in the Technology Wing. That work is expected to be completed by the end of 2018.The $2 million contribution from We Energies Foundation will contribute to Discovery World’s $18 million fundraising goal for the project. Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img read more

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Owen RaischLast updated on July 2nd 2019 at 0904

first_imgOwen RaischLast updated on July 2nd, 2019 at 09:04 pmMarquette University‘s College of Business Administration has formed a new Student-Run Business Program and invested $300,000 in the effort.Owen RaischThe businesses will be housed under a separate nonprofit holding company, Blue and Gold Ventures Inc.“The separation benefits us because it enables us to be a lot more agile,” said Owen Raisch, associate director of the Student-Run Business Program. “We can move a lot more quickly to do various business deals and we can use our own legal resources.” About 15 students from six student startups this week completed a summer accelerator program run by a seventh student startup, Eagle Incubator, to test out their ideas’ market traction. Each received $5,000 each in seed funding, and five to 12 advisory board members. They will now apply for inclusion in Blue and Gold Ventures this fall, Raisch said. The program is currently operating out of Milwaukee coworking space Ward4.The student startups are:Eagle Incubator, a student-run incubator for student businesses;Tangible, a student-run incubator for local consumer goods that is expected to launch this month in partnership with Startup Milwaukee;Buena Vida Coffee, a direct-trade coffee bean supplier that donates a meal to children in need for every bag sold;Vida, a brick-and-mortar coffee shop affiliated with Buena Vida Coffee, which plans to open a retail space this fall;ReVamp, a real estate investment venture focused on improving student housing near Marquette’s campus, with assistance from the Marquette commercial real estate program;The Blockchain Lab, a Marquette program that hosts events to increase awareness of blockchain technology;1881 Event Productions, an on-campus and Milwaukee-area event management company.Raisch modeled B&G Ventures after similar programs at Cornell University and Harvard University. The separate but affiliated nonprofit allows B&G to move quickly on startup opportunities, but also receive support from the university, he said.The goal is to give students hands-on experience running a real, financially sustainable business.“Basically what we’re doing is student run businesses are a very effective way of getting students out into the community,” he said. “But they’re also very effective at providing students with these hands-on, experiential learning opportunities.”And B&G Ventures plans to create jobs in the process.“By 2022, we expect to employ 250 students from Marquette and we expect to have at least 12 businesses up and running,” Raisch said. Get our email updatesBizTimes DailyManufacturing WeeklyNonprofit WeeklyReal Estate WeeklySaturday Top 10Wisconsin Morning Headlines Subscribelast_img read more

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Anna Gaeta receives Community Service Award from L

first_img Anna Gaeta receives Community Service Award from Luncheon Committee Ted Tomasone Christmas Fund Luncheon Christmas Fund Luncheon Committee Olivia Scimeca receives the Uncle Fred Carangelo Humanitarian Award, presented by City Councilor Lydia Edwards Ted Tomasone thanks Filippo and Philip Frattaroli for their support of the annual Christmas Fund Luncheon, held at Filippo’scenter_img Christmas Fund Luncheon Former City Councilor Sal LaMattina It was a full house at the 2018 North End Christmas Fund Luncheon as hundreds assembled at Filippo’s Ristorante for the annual charity event. The tradition raises thousands of dollars enabling the group to send out over 200 checks to North End seniors, low-income residents and families in need during this Christmas season. City Councilor Lydia Edwards and former Councilor Sal LaMattina joined with other dignitaries to celebrate and honor those who serve the community.Receiving honors this year:Olivia ScimecaUncle Fred Carangelo Humanitarian AwardAnna GaetaPrivate Ernest J. Natale Community Service AwardThe Christmas Fund Committee is led by Robert “Ted” Tomasone, John Romano of the North End Athletic Association and James Luisi of North End Waterfront Health. The committee includes members from local non-profit agencies: North End Athletic Association, North End Against Drugs, Nazzaro Community Center, North End Waterfront Health, North End Seniors, ABCD Head Start Program and North End / West End ABCD Service Center. For the last several years the luncheon has been held at Filippo’s Ristorante and the committee would like to thank the Frattaroli Family for all of their help and support in making the luncheon a huge success. Christmas Fund Luncheon at Filippo’slast_img read more

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The North End Waterfront Neighborhood Council N

first_imgThe North End / Waterfront Neighborhood Council (NEWNC) voted unanimously to oppose a petition to build a one-story addition and private roof deck at 2 Snelling Place at their March meeting. Read more and watch the video here. Neighborhood Council Opposes 2 Snelling Place Addition North End / Downtown Neighborhood Climate Planning Kicks Off With High Resident Engagement [Video] West End Museum Exhibit Traces Political Moves that Led to Neighborhood’s Destruction The West End Museum is hosting The Housing Act of 1949, a re-configured and updated exhibit that examines the path to the destruction of the Boston’s West End. It explores Democrat Harry S. Truman’s re-election in the face of a mounting housing demand, which prompted him to put urban renewal on the national agenda. Read more here. Design Commission Rejects Dock Square Garage Proposal This week’s top posts on NorthEndWaterfront.com featured real estate, developments, history, climate change, schools and more! Read on below to see the most popular articles from this past week. The Eliot School’s Junior Varsity debate team placed first overall at the Boston Debate League (BDL) Citywide Championship. The BDL debate session runs from October to March, with over 720 Boston Public School students participating at either middle or high school level. Read more and see photos here.center_img The City of Boston hosted a poster session to introduce the Climate Ready North End and Downtown projects. With flooding now a regular occurrence on the waterfront, the Climate Ready Boston initiative was introduced to prepare Boston for the long-term impacts of climate change and rising sea levels. Read more and watch the video here. Boston Inspectional Services has declared the building at 454-464 Hanover Street is structurally unsafe for occupancy. Residents were forced to evacuate on March 13th after city officials decided to condemn the property. Read more here. Editor’s Choice The Boston Civic Design Commission (BCDC) has voted against the Dock Square Garage redevelopment design. Advocates concerned about sight lines along the Greenway are hoping the rare BCDC vote will result in changes. Read more here.*Advertisement* Residents Evacuated from 454-464 Hanover Street as North End Building Declared Structurally Unsafe Eliot School Debate Team Wins First Place at Citywide Championshiplast_img read more

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Gizmodo reports that Facebook founder Mark Zucker

first_imgGizmodo reports that Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg sent a stern internal memo when it was discovered some employees were crossing out the “Black” in “Black Lives Matter” and replacing it with “All.”[Related: Mark Zuckerberg, Priscilla Chan, Welcome Baby Girl and Pledge to Give Away $45 Billion]“There have been several recent instances of people crossing out “black lives matter” and writing “all lives matter” on the walls at MPK” (Facebook’s Menlo Park, California headquarters),” Zuckerberg’s internal message begins.“Despite my clear communication at Q&A last week that this was unacceptable, and messages from several other leaders from across the company, this has happened again. I was already very disappointed by this disrespectful behavior, but after my communication, I now consider this malicious as well.”Facebook’s headquarters feature a signature wall where employees are free to write on and express their thoughts. Zuckerberg in the memo writes that while the company encourages free speech, “Crossing out something means silencing speech, or that one person’s speech is more important that another’s.”Zuckerberg concludes by writing that, “This has been a hurtful and tiresome experience for the black community and really the entire Facebook community,” and that the company was “investigating” the incidents.He then encourages employees to participate in the Black @ town hall on ¾ to “educate themselves about what the Black Lives Matter movement is about.”The young tech magnate has been increasingly politically and socially active, of late. Late last year he announced that he and his wife were establishing a $45 million foundation dedicated to global good causes and improving the world.He also recently posted about the injustices and need for reform in the prison system after visiting San Quentin. He wrote about the visit on his Facebook wall, “Making our criminal justice system fairer and more effective is a huge challenge for our country. I’m going to keep learning about this topic, but some things are already clear. We can’t jail our way to a just society, and our current system isn’t working.”The lack of diversity in Silicon Valley has been a hot-button topic. It was revealed that blacks make up less than 2% of the workforce at top tech companies including Facebook. MONEYLISTSOur Best Videos be_ixf; php_sdk; php_sdk_1.4.18 https://www.blackenterprise.com/zuckerberg-sends-warning-to-employees-for-altering-black-lives-matter-slogan/ https://www.blackenterprise.com/zuckerberg-sends-warning-to-employees-for-altering-black-lives-matter-slogan/last_img read more

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beixf phpsdk phpsdk1418 httpswwwbl

first_img be_ixf; php_sdk; php_sdk_1.4.18 https://www.blackenterprise.com/black-womens-tech-startup-awarded-10000-jpmorgan-chase-grant/ https://www.blackenterprise.com/black-womens-tech-startup-awarded-10000-jpmorgan-chase-grant/ WealthyLife, a tech startup focused on ending poverty through financial literacy, won a $10,000 grant from the JPMorgan Chase to develop a financial literacy mobile app.The grant was awarded during the financial inclusion innovation competition at the 2016 Color of Wealth Summit held by the Center for Global Policy Solutions (CGPS).“As an entrepreneurial team of black women, we’ve experienced firsthand the challenges underrepresented communities face when it comes to financial inclusion and access to capital, so we’re thrilled and thankful to CGPS and the JPMorgan Chase,” said Angel Rich who co-founded WealthyLife along with Courtney Keen and Shyaam Sundhar.With the grant, the WealthyLife team will turn its online app CreditStacker into a mobile app.CreditStacker is a financial education game described as “an innovative financial play on credit reports. The pieces will look and feel like credit items, accumulating over your life span to impact your credit score and net worth,” on the company’s site.The additional capital will allow WealthyLife to offer CreditStacker as a mobile app and add features including animation and levels to make the user experience interactive and engaging.As with the Web app, the CreditStacker mobile game will teach players how to manage various types of credit, interpret a credit report, achieve good credit, and avoid the risks associated with debt.CreditStacker will be offered for free in 28 cities as part of ConnectHome, a public-private collaboration to bring affordable broadband access, technical training, digital literacy, and electronic devices to underserved communities.“This grant will help us bring CreditStacker to the people who need it as a mobile app, furthering our mission to provide equal access to financial literacy for everyone,” said Rich.“JPMorgan Chase’s philanthropic work supports a range of programs to help people, particularly those from low- and moderate-income communities increase savings, improve credit, reduce financial shocks, and build assets,” said Janis Bowdler, managing director, Financial Capability, Community Development, and Small Business, JPMorgan Chase.WealthyLife was the winner among four other finalists including Working Solutions, PayActiv, and the Latino Economic Development Center.last_img read more

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By FFWPU Portugal In Europe the month of November

first_imgBy FFWPU PortugalIn Europe the month of November is the month in which Christians celebrate their ancestors, we also as the followers of True Parents, from a few years ago made our version. On November 13, 2016 we celebrated this day in 3 different locations in Portugal: Lisbone, Porto and Lousada. This day was also to remembering our loved ones who left to spiritual world. We celebrated with joy to praise their achievements, for the way and for the merits age that they left for us so that we can find the Messiah. We honored their lives by offering them food and incense, prayers and holy songs.This year we were very pleased to hold an inter-religious event with the support of one of our Peace Ambassadors, a Priest of the Roman Catholic Church, who knows True Parents well and has participated in many Divine Principle education workshops and events while living in Brazil.We created a very beautiful ceremony with a beautiful harmony that pleased both members and invited friends and family members who cherish this Christian celebration, which is most connected with the sense of death spoken in the Bible and the words of Jesus.Many members from the Lisbon community were present and in the end we shared foods that we brought as a one family under God.It was a very good event and all the participants were so happy. This was the first celebration in our Church.last_img read more

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Prepared by UPF Italy The Trofeo della Pace an

first_imgPrepared by UPF ItalyThe “Trofeo della Pace”, an inter-ethnic 7-player football tournament, took place on Sunday 24 June at the Sada stadium in Monza, with a large audience of all ages attending.This thirteenth edition was attended by 7 teams: CMR 50, the boys of the Mamma Rita Center, winners of last year – Atletico XX Settembre – Black United – CPIA Monza – Spallanzaska – UPF Sport for Peace, in addition to the Lions Corelli team of Milan who played a “game of welcome” against a selection of players from the Peace Trophy, for a total of a hundred young participants.In the afternoon the special “match of welcome” was held between a selection of the TrofeoPace and guests of the Corelli Lions Club, with the latter winning 1 to 0. Following the three final matches, which saw podium for the third place the CMR50, in second place the CPIA Monza, while they won the 2018 Trophy the young asylum seekers, all originally from Africa, of the Spallanzaska team.Testimonial of this year’s edition was Paolo Monelli, former player who played, among others, 167 games in the Serie A championship with the Fiorentina Team. Together with him were present for the finals and the awards Andrea Arbizzoni, Councilor for Sports of the City of Monza, Desirè Chiara Merlini, Councilor for Social Policies, Carlo Milva and Gaetano Galbiati del Fiammamonza, as well as Carlo Zonato, President of UPF Universal Peace Federation Italy.The initiative was supported by the Municipality of Monza, the Juvenilia Sports Club, with the concession of the training camp and the Sada stadium, the Mamma Rita Center in Monza, the CPIA Permanent Adult Education Center in Monza, while the CONI Lombardia and many Municipalities have granted patronage.Particularly beautiful matches of the finals, where they have distinguished the teams of the CMR 50, the youth of the Center Mamma Rita of Monza, supplemented by some friends, who have conquered the third place beating for 5 to 4 the strong guys of the Black team United of Brugherio, while the young striker of the CMR 50, Cheikh Dokhane, originally from Senegal, was awarded as the best player of the tournament.The final for the first place has seen the team of Spallanzaska prevail for 2 to 0 against the boys of the CPIA, in a game in the balance until the end, just the goalkeeper of the team winning the trophy, the young asylum seeker Adams Mohamed, was awarded as best goalkeeper.At the end the Councilor for Sport Arbizzoni expressed thanks to the organizers for this edition of the Trofeo della Pace, an initiative reputed as one of the best in the Brianza area for its mix of sport, youth and integration, while Carlo Chierico, President of UPF Monza and the soul of the tournament, confirmed that the peace paths carried out by the association are well highlighted by this inter-ethnic tournament, which reflects the values on which the vision of Universal Peace International, NGO active throughout the world and founded by the spouses Korean Moon.Meanwhile, the new women’s edition of the Trofeo della Pace has already been officially announced, with the inter-ethnic volleyball tournament to be held in September.last_img read more

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Last week Microsoft cohosted a funfilled day of

first_imgLast week, Microsoft co-hosted a fun-filled day of all things tech for African American girls. The event was held in conjunction with Girl STEM Stars, a nonprofit academy dedicated to advancing young people of color in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education.(Image: Kiwoba Cares)The girls gathered in Mountain View, California–in the heart of Silicon Valley. Speakers from Microsoft and NASA were on hand to talk about what it’s like working in technology.The girls also received hands-on STEM lessons. They participated in a coding class, tested drones, and got an up-and-close look at cutting-edge technology.Katherine Nurss, Microsoft Bing/event organizer said, “We’re giving them an opportunity to learn about and get exposure to data science and coding, and also to speak with people who work at Microsoft.”However, the No. 1 takeaway from this day is to show the girls that “this is all accessible” to them as career options, said Nurss.(Image: Kiwoba Cares)“Young girls need to know that they can do anything,” said Leticha Hawkins, a mother of one of the girls. “And that any area of occupation should be open to them. A lot of times you’ll hear girls say I’m not good at math, I’m not good at a certain type of subject and they should understand that there is always help. And this organization is one of the vehicles to learn there are people out there who want to encourage them and assist them in their journey.”(Image: Kiwoba Cares)“You don’t have to become a scientist or become an engineer in the traditional sense and I sort of wanted to tell them that you can redefine what an engineer is,” said software development engineer, Adebia Ntoso.“My goal is to encourage you to never give up,” Antoinette McCoy, associate chief, Technology Partnerships Office at NASA Ames Research Center, told the young women. “No matter what the circumstance is, no matter what you think are your limitations, never give up.” be_ixf; php_sdk; php_sdk_1.4.18 https://www.blackenterprise.com/microsoft-hosts-encouraging-and-empowering-girls-stem-tech-day/ https://www.blackenterprise.com/microsoft-hosts-encouraging-and-empowering-girls-stem-tech-day/last_img read more

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The Only 5 Social Media Sites You NeedBillionDoll

first_img The Only 5 Social Media Sites You NeedBillion-Dollar Equity Firm Partners With John H…Billion-Dollar Equity Firm Invests in Harlem Ca… Today is a new day. What was once reserved for the elite is now a thing of the past. You, too, can become an angel investor with equity crowdfunding. In May 2016, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission enacted Title III of the JOBS Act, allowing non-accredited investors—the majority of the U.S. population—to invest in startups. There were a lot of legalities surrounding them so the birth of equity crowdfunding platforms was born.There are several platforms that provide this opportunity and each has a slightly different setup.Four top equity crowdfunding investment platforms:RepublicRepublic was built to democratize investing and level out the fundraising landscape for founders and investors alike. It’s SEC-registered, FINRA-licensed, and if you’re at all interested in startups, you’ve heard of their past work: Republic is part of a family of startup platforms together with AngelList, Product Hunt, and CoinList—one of the most trusted online startup ecosystems in the world. They have a minimum investment of $25.Whose Your Landlord (Image: Republic)SeedInvestThe startups on the SeedInvest platform are highly vetted. According to the site, in the past, they’ve accepted just ~1% of startups that apply. The startups listed must all successfully pass their comprehensive due diligence process. Their minimum investments start at $500.CrowdfunderCrowdfunder claims they are the equity crowdfunding leader for sourcing and funding high-growth ventures with a network of over 130,000 entrepreneurs and investors.Crowdfunder and its VC Index Fund provide the opportunity for direct online investment into single ventures, as well as diversification into a broad VC-led portfolio (Index Fund) of early-stage startups—backed by many of the world’s leading venture capital firms and private investors. They have $160,000,000 investment commitments on the platform, 12,000 individual and institutional investors, and 36,000 companies. So far, they’ve funded 100+ deals at an average deal size of $1.8M.IndieGoGoWe know them as a traditional crowdfunding site but they have since partnered with MicroVentures and launched, an equity component of the platform. They are one of the few platforms that support investments in cryptocurrency, blockchain, and ICOs (Initial Coin Offerings). be_ixf; php_sdk; php_sdk_1.4.18 https://www.blackenterprise.com/top-equity-crowdfunding-platforms-allow-you-to-invest-in-startups/ https://www.blackenterprise.com/top-equity-crowdfunding-platforms-allow-you-to-invest-in-startups/last_img read more

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