Ateneo snatches top spot, FEU humbles La Salle in men’s PVL

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Marck Espejo led Ateneo with 17 points while Ishmael Rivera added 10.Joshua Umandal had 10 points to lead the Tigers who struggled in the offensive converting just 27 of its 93 spike attempts.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogIn the second game, Far Eastern University bounced back after losing the third set and dropped De La Salle, 25-23, 25-19, 23-25, 25-18, to take its second win.The Tamaraws are now at 2-1 to tie UST at the second spot while La Salle dropped to 1-2. Winning start End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Mayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’ Break new ground MOST READ Better competition key to Kai Sotto’s improvement, says Uichico Mark Detablan had 17 points to lead FEU while getting ample support from three of his teammates.Redijohn Paler and Richardo Solis had 14 and 13 points, respectively, for the Tamaraws while substitute Jude Garcia added 11.Arjay Onia had a game-high 19 points to lead the Green Spikers.ADVERTISEMENT End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Ateneo took down University of Santo Tomas in straight sets, 25-21, 25-17, 25-18, to earn the top seed in the Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference men’s division Saturday at Filoil Flying V Centre.The Blue Eagles continued their win streak and improved to 3-0 while the Growling Tigers slipped to 2-1.ADVERTISEMENT Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Learning about the ‘Ring of Fire’ LATEST STORIES OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson A costly, catty dispute finally settled Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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GOL Lacks Hand-Eye Coordination

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Former Foreign Minister King-Akerele Releases New Book

first_imgThe Former Minister of Foreign Affairs and former Minister of Commerce and Industry, Madam Olubanke King-Akerele, recently released her fourth book entitled, “The Liberian Way: Breaking the Cycle.” The foreword of the book is written by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, while the book is a publication of the Liberian Institute for “Growing” Patriotism and the Angie Brooks International Centre (ABIC) for Women’s Empowerment, Leadership Development, International Peace and Security. The launching ceremony was held in conjunction with the dedication of the Ruth Morgenthau Reading Room at the Louis Arthur Grimes School of Law at the University of Liberia (UL).Vice President Joseph Boakai, who performed the official launch, described Madam Akerele as a prolific writer, noting that the book is her fourth since she left government. Boakai said the development of emergent leaders is a key program area in several African nations. He hailed former Minster Akerele for bringing the subject matter into the spotlight through her book. Veep Boakai said Liberia has been through a lot of tribulations in recent years and as the country is in the process of rebuilding and rebranding itself, the people must include deliberate and drastic change from being “business as usual.” He urged Liberians to adopt an attitude of transformation, stating: “let’s celebrate and recognize the leadership modules that have impacted our nation the most. Let’s think about changing minds and changing attitudes” as propounded by former Information Minister Lawrence Bropleh. He said it is within that dimension that the book delves into the descriptive and narrative challenges associated with reconstruction and nation building. Boakai explained that the “Liberian Way” as defined in the book means taking “shortcuts, lack of standards, doing the wrong things, but careless because it is convenient.” Such impediments that constitute the “cycle” need to be broken, he said. The author divided the book into five parts with part one documenting the experience of the ABIC in Africa, generally, and in Liberia in particular with support for the “Nurturing and Growing” of its Emergent Leadership. Part two documents a selected number of initiatives that are ongoing or have taken place in the country that are contributing to the “growing of Liberia’s Emergent Leadership.” The book entitled, “Patriotism in Action,” highlights some of the many positive things that Liberians are engaged in that are nothing short of Patriotism in Action, but are hardly heard about.Akerele went on to explain that part three contains inspiring life paths of mid-career professionals, while part four contains profiles of Liberians from the earlier book, The “Growing of Africa’s Emergent Leadership.” Part five focuses on “Plaiting the New Mat: Breaking the Cycle of the Liberian Way,” and tackles the issue of what has come to be referred to as “the Liberian Way” – a problem brought into focus by the discussion on the motivation behind the writing, since it is seen as critical to the future of the country.Dr. Herman Browne, President of Cuttington University, who critiques the book, noted that it is very refreshing to be reading a book by one author and hearing several other voices and their perspective on the same theme. He described the style by the Madam Akerele as an unusual approach, but said what is paramount is that, “the book makes readers not just to think about patriotism, but to feel patriotism, which makes it more related to poetry than to prose.” He said in reading the book, “there is something that makes you to appreciate and see how easy it is to be frustrated that the generation so cherished and loved either knows so little or appreciates so little of what is so important.” The Dedication of the Ruth Morgenthau Reading RoomThe program also included the dedication of a reading room at the Louis Arthur Grimes School of Law, University of Liberia. Liberia’s former Ambassador to the United States, Charles Minor and former Dean of the Louis Arthur Grimes School of Law, Cllr. David A.B. Jallah, performed the dedication of the Ruth Morgenthau Reading Room (RMRR), where the ceremony was held. Amb. Minor recounted the history leading to the establishment of the reading room, noting that the reading room dates back to 2010 at the time Madam Akerele was Minister of Foreign Affairs. He outlined the immense contributions she made to ensure the establishment of the room. The RMRR is named after a distinguished American scholar, and international political scientist who was a specialist on Francophone Africa. She was born in Vienna and managed to escape along with her family from Nazi prosecution. Ruth grew up to become prominent, serving as Foreign Policy Adviser to three US Democratic Presidents. She lent her expertise to the United Nations (was part of the U.S.A. delegation to the United Nations) and the World Bank in various capacities.Upon her death, Ruth’s widower called to say that he wanted to donate her library to Madam Akerele, her former student at Brandeis University in Massachusetts. He said he could not think of anyone else she would have wanted to have her books. It was then that MadamAkerele contacted the Louis Arthur Grimes School of Law to receive the collection and set it up there. Ambassador Minor then Liberia’s Ambassador to the United States assisted in this process, as did the President of the University, Dr. Emmet Dennis to get the books to Liberia together with the then Dean of the Law School, Cllr. David Jallah. He was assisted by Cllr. Krubo Kollie, then Legal Counsellor at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.Professor Morgenthau’s daughter Sarah (then Director of the Peace Corps Response office in Washington DC) visited Liberia in the second half of 2010 at which time she presented the books. Unfortunately, as the Minister was on mission, she could not be there during the presentation. The Morgenthau family sent an official message during the dedication of the library pledging to provide a computer and printer to facilitate the use of the RMRR.The ceremony was attended by UL president Dr. Dennis; the Dean of the UL Law School, Cllr. Negbalee Warner; President of Stella Maris, Sister Mary Laurene Brown; Rev. Emmanuel Bowier; Judge Eva Mappy Morgan; among others. Madam Akerele had previously written books entitled, “Women’s Leadership in Post-Conflict Liberia”; “My Journey,” launched in 2012; “Accelerating Regional Integration through Micro Regionalism: the case of Zambia-Malawi-Mozambique”; “Growth Triangle and its Impact”; and “The ‘Growing of Africa’s Emergent Leadership,” launched in 2014 in Lusaka, Zambia, with the foreword by the first President of Zambia, Dr. Kenneth Kaunda.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Leicester boss Pearson accepts FA charge

first_img Nigel Pearson Leicester manager Nigel Pearson has accepted a Football Association charge of using insulting words towards a fan.The FA has confirmed the 51-year-old has accepted the charge of using “abusive and/or insulting words towards a spectator” during his side’s 3-1 defeat to Liverpool and has requested a personal hearing.Pearson had refused to apologise to the fan despite a video emerging of the incident and calls from the Leicester City Supporters Club to say sorry.Pearson said in the wake of the incident: “I have had run-ins with fans in the past and in the heat of the moment these things happen and there won’t be any apology.”He added: ‘If people were offended by what happened in some ways that is regrettable, but there’s no need for me to apologise to someone of that ilk.”The heat has increased on the Foxes boss following an awful run of results which has seen his side take just two points from their last 11 Premier League games.They lie three points adrift at the bottom of the table ahead of a trip to fourth-placed West Ham on Saturday. 1last_img read more

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Real Madrid block Bale China move over fee: source

first_imgThe source dismissed reports by Spanish daily Marca which said the Welsh player’s family had blocked a potential move to Asia.Marca said those close to Bale had asked his representatives to look for clubs in Europe “before definitively saying yes to Jiangsu Suning’s offer”.The Chinese transfer window closes on Wednesday.The 77-time capped Welsh international had been told by Real coach Zinedine Zidane he does not form part of his future plans at the Bernabeu.The former Tottenham Hotspur winger came off the bench to play half an hour in Real’s record 7-3 defeat to rivals Atletico Madrid on Saturday.Real boss Zidane said last weekend he thought it would be “best for everyone” if Bale’s departure could be arranged quickly — comments Bale’s agent branded “disrespectful” of a player who helped the side to a Spanish league title and four Champions Leagues since arriving from Tottenham six years ago.Zidane then insisted on Monday he meant no disrespect before Bale came on as a substitute in a midweek 3-2 friendly win over Arsenal in the United States.“He had a good game and I’m happy for him,” Zidane said. “I do not know what’s going to happen, for now he’s with us. It did not change anything,” he added.0Shares0000(Visited 5 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Gareth Bale has won the Champions League on four occasions with Real Madrid © AFP/File / ATTILA KISBENEDEKMadrid, Spain, Jul 28 – Gareth Bale’s move to Chinese side Jiangsu Suning collapsed on Sunday after Real Madrid cancelled the proposed deal due to wrangling over the fee, a source told AFP on Sunday. Bale, 30, who has been in the Spanish capital since 2013, was expected to join the Chinese Super League outfit on a three-year-deal worth £1 million ($1.1 million) a week.last_img read more

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Swilly Seals swim the Wild Atlantic Way – virtual style!

first_imgSwilly Seals managed to swim Donegal’s Wild Atlantic Way in ten hours – without leaving the same location!The Letterkenny swimming club took on the Donegal Wild Atlantic Way (555kms) on 3 December last completing the distance in a little over 10 hours.The swim took place in the Aura Leisure Centre in Letterkenny. Taking part in the event were current club members, aged between 7 and 17 years of age, ex-club members, 24/7 Triathlon Club members and members of the general public.It was quite fitting that when the urgent call went out on Facebook for more swimmers that Paddy Bond Snr (Club coach in the 1990’s) and Emmett Toner answered the call.Emmett’s late father Mickey Toner was one of the clubs founding members back in 1985.At 5.30pm it was announced that the distance had been reached, all swimmers got out of the water leaving the final 25 metres of the day to be completed by the current Swilly Seals members. A huge word of thanks to Aura for use of the pool for the full day, all swimmers, parents, volunteers, lap counters, Pat Brady for the food and especially all of the sponsors who supported the event in helping the club raise necessary funds.Swilly Seals swim the Wild Atlantic Way – virtual style! was last modified: December 5th, 2017 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalSwilly SealsWild Atlantic Waylast_img read more

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Eureka outlasts Del Norte 37-27 to advance to Dick Niclai Tournament semifinals

first_imgCrescent City >> The old adage in athletics that it’s difficult to beat a team three times in the same season, regardless of sport, rang true yet again.The Eureka Loggers used a suffocating defense and pure hustle on the backboards to defeat the Del Norte Warriors 37-27 in the opening round of the Dick Niclai Tournament at Crescent City Wednesday evening.With the victory, the Loggers advance to take on the Little 4 champion St. Bernard’s Crusaders Friday evening, while the Warriors await …last_img

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Photo library: Countryside 15

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Countryside contact sheet (1.6MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Western Cape province:An ostrich farm in the Oudtshoorn district. Ostrich meat is an increasingly popular low-fat alternative to red meat.Photo: Rodger Bosch,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Western Cape province:An ostrich farm in the Oudtshoorn district. Ostrich meat is an increasingly popular low-fat alternative to red meat.Photo: Rodger Bosch,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Western Cape province:An ostrich farm in the Oudtshoorn district. Ostrich meat is an increasingly popular low-fat alternative to red meat.Photo: Rodger Bosch,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Western Cape province:An ostrich farm in the Oudtshoorn district. Ostrich meat is an increasingly popular low-fat alternative to red meat.Photo: Rodger Bosch,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Western Cape province:An ostrich farm in the Oudtshoorn district. Ostrich meat is an increasingly popular low-fat alternative to red meat.Photo: Rodger Bosch,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Western Cape province:An ostrich farm in the Oudtshoorn district. Ostrich meat is an increasingly popular low-fat alternative to red meat.Photo: Rodger Bosch,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Western Cape province:An ostrich farm in the Oudtshoorn district. Ostrich meat is an increasingly popular low-fat alternative to red meat.Photo: Rodger Bosch,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Western Cape province:An ostrich farm in the Oudtshoorn district. Ostrich meat is an increasingly popular low-fat alternative to red meat.Photo: Rodger Bosch,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Western Cape province:An ostrich farm in the Oudtshoorn district. Ostrich meat is an increasingly popular low-fat alternative to red meat.Photo: Rodger Bosch, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image COUNTRYSIDE 15: {loadposition cs}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.last_img read more

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Oh captain, my captain

first_imgHandsome Thamsanqa Matsane is theSouth African Navy’s newest commandingofficer. Commander Matsane is piped aboardthe SAS Queen Modjadji.(Images: Dean Wingrin) The SAS Charlotte Maxeke was Matsane’sprevious posting.(Image: South African Navy) MEDIA CONTACTS • Captain Jaco Theunissen  SAN public relations  +27 12 339 4349 RELATED ARTICLES • Maritime piracy under the spotlight • Two centuries of SA military history • SA to host military workshop • Voyage’s end for Agulhas • Rooivalk gets its wingsJanine ErasmusSouth Africa recently celebrated the appointment of its first black submarine commander, Handsome Thamsanqa Matsane, who took the helm of the SAS Queen Modjadji just before the end of April.The South African Navy (SAN) has just three submarines to its name, which makes the commander’s achievement all the more note-worthy. The ceremony took place at the Simon’s Town naval base on the Cape peninsula.Matsane (34) joined the SAN in 1998 and shone at the Saldanha Military Academy on the country’s west coast, graduating as the best mathematics student. With a BA in military science in hand, he served as a combat officer on the fleet support ship SAS Drakensberg and the Valour-class frigates SAS Isandlwana and SAS Spioenkop.Navy life above the waves was abandoned when he joined the submarine squadron in 2007 and rose rapidly through the ranks, overcoming the many challenges faced by submariners and taking up the position of executive officer aboard the submarine SAS Charlotte Maxeke.South African heroines, past and presentWith the SAS Queen Modjadji and the SAS Manthatisi, this vessel is the third of SAN’s Heroine class of submarines.All Type 209/1400 vessels, developed by German ship builders Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft, the three commemorate a trio of remarkable South African women.The SAS Queen Modjadji was named after South Africa’s rain queen, who lived in Limpopo province and was believed to have special powers including the ability to control the clouds and rainfall.The SAS Manthatisi is named after the female warrior chief of the Batlokwa tribe of the North West province, who reigned, according to documentation, in the 1820s. She reportedly led an army of more than 50 000 troops during territorial wars.Charlotte Maxeke, who gave her name to the third submarine, was a political activist and founding member of the African National Congress Women’s League.Matsane grew up in Bushbuckridge in Mpumalanga province – far from the sea – and named his grandmother, the venerable Betty Mashabane, as his personal heroine and inspiration.“Although she doesn’t have an education, she would always tell us that ‘education will help you get through’, even in the hard times,” said Matsane.He’s encouraging youngsters who aspire to a naval career to focus on maths and science at school, because many of the top jobs are technical in nature, especially on submarines.Matsane also wants more women to join the navy.“We have women still in training but in total there are only some 15 women in the submarine squadron. We need lots more South Africans, both men and women, to join up.”Not one to shy away from a challenge, Matsane completed the transatlantic Cape to Rio yacht race in 2003 after setting foot for the first time on a sailing ship just six weeks before.His performance was good enough to catch the eye of the Chilean navy, and he was invited to serve for four months aboard the controversial tall ship BE Esmeralda, a training vessel for junior officers, on her journey around the world.Ninety years of the South African NavyThe navy had another reason to celebrate in April, and that is because it turned 90 at the beginning of the month.The national military body was officially established on 1 April 1922 with three ships in its fleet – the Hunt-class hydrographic survey ship HMS Crozier and the two Mersey-class minesweeping trawlers HMS Eden and HMS Foyle were loaned to South Africa by the Royal Navy.The three vessels were returned to the Royal Navy in the 1930s and reverted to their original names, but were later renamed to HMSAS Protea, HMSAS Immortelle and HMSAS Sonneblom to commemorate their service in South African waters.Unofficially, the SAN began to take shape in the 19th century when the Port Elizabeth Naval Volunteer Brigade came into being in 1861, but it was only in 1885 that a more enduring volunteer unit, the Natal Naval Volunteers, was formed in Durban.The unit served in the South African War of 1899 to 1902, and in the Zulu Rebellion of 1906. It later became the reserve unit SAS Inkonkoni, which merged in 1913 with the Cape Naval Volunteers, known later as the SAS Unitie. The two units together formed the South African division of the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve.In 1946 the fledgling navy, known as the South African Naval Forces, was absorbed into the Union Defence Force. The Union of South Africa was the forerunner to the present-day Republic of South Africa.In 1951 the South African Naval Forces officially became the South African Navy, which meant that ships were renamed from the title of HMSAS – His Majesty’s South African Ship – to simply SAS, or South African Ship.In April 1994, the year that democracy arrived in South Africa, the SAN and the other branches of the South African Defence Force – the army, the air force and the medical corps – became the South African National Defence Force.last_img read more

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Consumers Don’t Want Prototypes (They Want iPads)

first_imgRelated Posts Honeycomb: Where are the Apps? The Sales?Then you have the newly launched Android Honeycomb tablets from Motorola, Samsung, LG and others.Honeycomb, Google’s tablet-optimized version of its Android mobile operating system was built so quickly that the code base that powers smartphones (Gingerbread) still exists separately from that which powers tablets. Unlike with Apple’s iPad, all Android smartphone apps don’t “magically” work on Honeycomb at present. There are only 100 or so apps that do.Of course, with Honeycomb, mobile industry insiders can see the potential here, too. When Google launches its next version of Android, the one code-named “Ice Cream” (or “Ice Cream Sandwich”), Android’s smartphone code base and tablet code base will merge and become one. That means it will be easier for developers to make apps that work on both the smartphone and tablet platforms. And Android has a large enough developer base, thanks to its dominating smartphone market share, that many of these developers will do just that. But right now, it’s just too hard. And there’s not an established market for Honeycomb apps as of yet.That hasn’t stopped companies like Motorola, Samsung and LG from preparing Honeycomb tablets, though, and it hasn’t stopped them from putting those tablets out in the market tied to long-term cellular contracts. And it hasn’t stopped comments like these, from Samsung’s VP of Mobile Lee Don-joo, from making the rounds in the press. “Samsung will have to improve the parts that are inadequate,” he said of the company’s new Honeycomb tablet.Steve Jobs never called the iPad inadequate.And we’re surprised that these Honeycomb tablets don’t fly off the shelves? While I sort of want to applaud a company that tries to think differently about mobile, there’s no other way to describe this phone but to call it, simply, a prototype.The Echo is a concept device made real. It’s heavy and thick. A brick when shut. There’s a large bezel in between the two screens that, when opened, makes even the two-screen optimized applications hard to fully enjoy. That’s not to say there aren’t some interesting choices, like the YouTube queuing and viewing app, VueQue, or the fun Jibe Social Messenger, both of which have already made themselves two-screen ready.In practice, however, I don’t love two screens. Not like this. It’s an unfinished product. It’s…well, it’s just weird. And yet, strangely, it’s available for sale now from Sprint. A prototype! It’s shocking. There’s no software update that can fix this phone’s issues. It needs better hardware. It may even need hardware that doesn’t exist yet. Or maybe the core idea is a mistake. Maybe that’s why Microsoft killed its dual-screen Courier tablet. Maybe having two screens is a terrible, terrible idea.PlayBook Shipped Before FinishedFinally, there’s the BlackBerry PlayBook.Decent enough hardware, easy to pocket thanks to its 7-inch size. A good Web browser that doesn’t default to mobile views (thank you!). But it has very few applications. And no email client, no contacts, no calendar. What is this thing? Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement What it is is an unfinished tablet computer. RIM completed the hardware design then shipped, with plans to roll out everything else the tablet needs via software updates, including core applications like email and calendaring. RIM also plans to add support for Android applications at a later date in order to fix the “app problem.” But instead of running any Android app using virtualization techniques, developers will have to take their Android applications and repackage them for the PlayBook.So will they? It’s hard to say. If RIM hasn’t arrived too late in the years-long trend that has been“the consumerization of I.T.,” there may still be a chance to persuade its enterprise customers to throw the PlayBook into the mix, alongside BES installations and BlackBerry smartphones. Plus, RIM’s “BlackBerry” name may still be just enough of a consumer-trusted brand that non-enterprise customers will buy the tablet, if not in record-breaking numbers, at least at a steady enough pace to give it a chance to grow.If that happens, then there’s a market for apps. And if there’s a market, developers may then decide to repackage their Android apps for the PlayBook or even build native ones. But even tech bloggers, journalists and analysts can’t foretell the future here. The tablet received mixed reviews in the press, then surprised analysts with not-as-horrible-as-we-thought day one sales (nearly 50,000 units sold). Still, long-term, what chance does the PlayBook have against the iPad2 in the consumer market, a tablet so popular that Apple literally (I’m not being exaggerative here, I mean it literally) can’t make enough? Bizarre PrototypesAnother product that recently landed in my confused hands this week is Kyocera’s bizarre, two-screen wonder called the Echo. Yes, a dual-screen Android phone. There’s an interesting trend happening in mobile these days. Companies – major companies like Samsung, Motorola, Kyocera, RIM and Microsoft – are launching unfinished, unpolished products and then asking us, the consumers, to buy them based on their “potential.” Despite the fact that the new BlackBerry tablet computer has no email client or wide selection of apps, or that Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7 can’t even multi-task, or that Android Honeycomb is only a few months old and, frankly, still a little buggy, we’re expected to place our hard-earned dollars, and, in some cases, even sign multi-year mobile contracts for these gadgets, based on “what could be.”Not biting? Well, you’re not alone.Note: This is an op-ed. Too Many Prototypes, Unfinished ProductsAndroidtabletsaren’t selling well. The Motorola Xoom, specifically, may have bombed. Windows Phone isn’t selling well. And the PlayBook? Too soon to tell. Meanwhile, Apple is pulling in record-breaking numbers. Unlike much of its competition, Apple doesn’t launch prototypes or unfinished products. Not surprisingly, it’s a strategy that seems to work.This thought occurred to me as array of gadgets crossed my desk over recent weeks.Windows Phone 7: Waiting for the Big Update, New HardwareFor starters, HTC’s HD7, a Windows Phone 7 device which I’ve painstakingly adopted as my primary phone in order to thoroughly test it and understand the end user experience. (Short conclusion: it’s not ready).Microsoft touts its numbers – registered developers, downloads of its development tools, number of applications. But it won’t say how many phones have been sold. Not because it doesn’t know, but because it’s a number not worth bragging about yet.Tech-savvy early adopters may be see the roadmap ahead for this platform – the planned updates, the apps on the horizon, the new hardware  – and get excited about what Windows Phone could be. They can also piece together what the Microsoft/Nokia partnership means for future devices. The combination of Nokia’s hardware design, great cameras, Microsoft’s attractive and innovative operating system design and a big bang of a software update (“Mango,” due out this fall), and Windows Phone has the potential to one day be an important player in mobile, if only the king of the second tier.Whether the two companies can effectively combine their resources, leverage the appropriate assets and generally make things work is another thing altogether. sarah perez Tags:#Apple#BlackBerry#Google#Microsoft#mobile#Op-Ed#Sponsors#Trends#web What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Why iPad 2 is WinningThe point is, each of these companies is asking consumers to take a risk, to place their bets on what may or may not be the next big thing. But while we lived in a modern, gadget-obsessed world, we still don’t casually throw away hundreds of dollars on what still amounts to a very risky gamble.Many consumers wait for a company to tell them, “this is the answer, this is beautiful, this is perfect.” Apple’s messaging does exactly that, and while, on a personal level, the increasingly pretentious commercials drive me a little batty at times, (“when technology gets out of the way…that’s when you leap forward…iPad2”), at least Apple isn’t asking for us to believe in a prototype.The everyday consumer doesn’t buy a product based on its “potential.” They buy based on what works, what they can afford and what they’re told is good.Sadly, there’s no way around the fact that companies have to rush to ship in order to have a chance at catching up to Apple’s already dramatic lead here, but it’s also the very thing that’s causing these products to either fail, stagnate, or just barely hang on as the companies quickly try to ramp up behind-the-scenes.Wouldn’t it be great to see something finished, polished, complete, perfect and downright disruptive, from someone else besides Apple? I’d welcome the change, but even as Windows Phone-using, Android-loving, PlayBook-testing, iPad-owning gadget fan, I don’t believe that day has arrived yet. What we have instead is a lot of spaghetti thrown against a wall, and some that will stick.What will your next gadget be? Choose wisely, you have a lot of money riding on that bet.Image credits, Nokia phones, Kyocera: Engadget, and Engadget The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

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